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The Dinner Party by Judy Chicago

he Dinner Party by Judy Chicago is a monumental multimedia artwork honoring women's achievements in history through a series of place settings at a dinner table. Each of thirty-nine goddesses and historical figures-among them Sappho, Sojourner Truth, Emily Dickinson, Petronilla de Meath, and Georgia O'Keeffe-is represented on a fourteen-inch painted-china plate that rests upon an elaborately needleworked runner evoking the time in which the woman lived. Each month of this calendar depicts a plac

The "Dinner Party" Entrance banners

Banners Outside the "Dinner Party"

The Dinner Party

Hatshepsut She reigned over Ancient Egypt as its veritable pharaoh while the official king was still too young to rule effectively. During her reign she adopted a role and title typically reserved for male rulers.

Judy Chicago needed the help of many to create her istalation art piece called the "dinner Party". Thus, she included a panel recognizing each contributor

Six woven banners (5' 6" x 3' 6" each) hang in procession, welcoming visitors to The Dinner Party. Designed by Chicago, the tapestries repeat the red, black, and gold tones associated with The Dinner Party and incorporate motifs found throughout the piece, such as triangular, floral, and abstracted butterfly forms. After painting the images on paper and selecting the thread colors, Chicago transferred her designs to graph paper, creating cartoons

Heritage Panel The seven Heritage Panels are large-scale hand-colored photo-and-text collages (ranging in size from 57 1/2 x 70 3/4 to 57 1/2 x 107") that portray the lives of the mythical and historical women whose names are inscribed in the Heritage Floor of The Dinner Party. Judy Chicago, with the help of a team of researchers, selected 999 women from prehistory to the 20th century, whose example impacted women's history and the improvement of women's conditions.

Elizabeth Blackwell Plate

Primordial Goddesd & Fertility goddess Plce Settings

Natalie Barney (b. 1876, Dayton, Ohio; d. 1972, Paris, France) Natalie Barney was both a poet and a prose writer, who was famous for her weekly salons, which gathered together many of the twentieth century's greatest artists and writers from the Western world. She is celebrated for openly living and writing as a lesbian during a time when women's behavior was closely circumscribed.

magine hosting a dinner party for 1,038 of the most extraordinary women in history, 39 of whom are honored by individual place settings at a dinner table nearly 150 feet long. “The Dinner Party” makes this vision into a reality at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Feminist icon Judy Chicago created this monumental work of art comprised of a triangular table divided by three wings, each 48 feet long.

Place Setting for Sappho Called the Tenth Muse by Plato, Sappho was a prolific poet of ancient Greece. She innovated the form of poetry through her first-person narration (instead of writing from the vantage point of the gods) and by refining the lyric meter. The details of Sappho's life have been obscured by legend and mythology, and the best source of information is the Suidas, a Greek lexicon compiled in the 10th century.

Sophia Goddess of Wisdom Place Setting Sophia (writes Chicago in the book which accompanies the installation at the Brooklyn Musuem) stands for “the highest form of feminine wisdom … an entirely abstract symbol that possesses a spiritual wholeness in which the material world is altogether transcended.” Chicago writes Sophia was sought of as “providing nourishment and translation of the human spirit …”

As an artist, author, feminist, educator and intellectual in the vanguard of the now worldwide Feminist Art movement, Judy Chicago has been a leader and model for an art that seeks to effect social change. The opening in March 2007 of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum marks a key chapter in her career. Not only a milestone for the artist, the opening of this permanent housing for her foundational work, The Dinner Party (1975-79), is a major step in the insti

  • Michele Telford

    My Mom took me to this art exhibit years ago. It's about empowering women - an extreme approach for sure - noted in art history.

Six woven banners (5' 6" x 3' 6" each) hang in procession, welcoming visitors to The Dinner Party. Designed by Chicago, the tapestries repeat the red, black, and gold tones associated with The Dinner Party and incorporate motifs found throughout the piece, such as triangular, floral, and abstracted butterfly forms. After painting the images on paper and selecting the thread colors, Chicago transferred her designs to graph paper, creating cartoons (patterns weavers use), which were then attached