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Stepables, a grassy replacement for walkways and small areas - soft and cool to the touch, and the more they get stepped on, the more they thrive!

How to collect, transplant, and care for moss. If you want to add moss to your pots or planters, this article explains how to establish it and get it growing. | The Micro Gardener

How to collect moss | Moss and Stone Gardens

mossandstonegardens.com

20 Plants for garden pathways which can handle foot traffic

Ground cover for stepping stone path. It makes creating a stone walkway easier in two ways: you can skip the thick gravel base. The plants will hide stones that shift and become uneven. Also, you don’t have to lay the stones perfectly. Ground cover plants that can tolerate foot traffic: Creeping Thyme, Blue Star Creeper, Brass Buttons, Creeping Mazus, Sedum.

Affordable Garden Path Ideas

familyhandyman.com

Stones set amid this creeping groundcover makes a natural looking path.

Room Ideas: Indoor Projects: Remodeling Ideas

freshhomeideas.com

Corsican mint can be trained to go between some pavers. It is very low growing, it is supposed to be able to "be trod upon" and it smells wonderful!

Corsican Mint- Beautiful shade loving ground cover that doesn't mind foot traffic and smells like creme de menthe!

Corsican Mint! - The Awl

theawl.com

DIY garden path with random-shaped flagstones and ground cover plants as filler

Pratia or White Star Creeper is a herbaceous perennial groundcover used as a lawn substitute, as fillers in pathways, in rock gardens and in borders. A profusion of starry white flowers bloom spring through summer, followed by globular, reddish-purple fruit in autumn, attracting birds. This plant will tolerate wet or dry conditions in sun or shade. Low growing (2-3" tall). Zones 5-10

STEPABLES.COM - Plants that tolerate foot traffic

stepables.com

Mosquito repelling Creeping Thyme plant. It has citronella oil that makes it smell lemony. Need this!

wooly thyme, creeping thyme, "little prince" thyme, and elfin thyme

Rudbeckia hirta Common name: Black-eyed Susan Family: Asteraceae Height: 1 - 3.5 feet Spreads: None Sun Exposure: Full Sun, Partial Sun Soil Texture: Clay, Loamy Soil Moisture: Dry, Moist pH: 6 - 7 Blooms in: June to October Bloom Color: yellow, black eye Bears Fruit: None Fruit Type: capsule Evergreen: no Ground Cover: no Habitat: fields, meadows, and roadsides Wildlife Use: Butterflies, Song Birds, Insects, Bees

acalypha repens (dwarf chenille) - sun or shade, avg-moist soil, e/green except if frost (will die and come back)

My Garden Path: Covering Ground

nanak-mygardenpath.blogspot.com

Mazus reptans, low growing ground cover only 1 to 3 inches high. Bright green foliage persists into the fall, staying semi-evergreen in the winter. Purplish-blue or white flowers appearing in June and July. Mazus grows in full sun to partial shade and prefers moist conditions. Herbaceous perennial, it can spread fast by its creeping stems which root at the nodes forming a thick mat. Mazus will take some foot traffic, has no disease or insect problems, and is deer resistant. –Bob Orazi“

One of the best low-growing Junipers, with its softer, more feathery texture, brighter yellow summer color, and fall hues of subtle coral. Spreads 3-5' in 10 years, but stays only 6" high, making it an eye-catching choice for a ground cover or front-of-the-border spot. Plant in morning sun, afternoon shade, and average soil, moist but well-drained. Juniperus horizontalis ‘Gold Strike’ ; 4" pot.

Carpet Bugle - This low growing 4-6 inch tall ground cover spreads rapidly, forming attractive mats of dark green foliage. 6 inch spikes of blue flowers cover the plants in spring and early summer and are spectacular in mass plantings. A terrific choice for banks, under trees, next to foundations, or in containers. Needs moist soil and full sun, or part to light shade. Winter hardy to zone 3.

Carpet Bugle Seeds | Ajuga | Bugleweed | Ground Cover Seeds

swallowtailgardenseeds.com

Purple Jackmanii - Love it. - The Jackmanii clematis is probably the best known of all the clematis vines. It was the first one I grew in my first real garden. The saying goes: " Her head in the sunshine, her feet in the shade." Choose a sunny spot, with at least six hours sun, but give the soil a little cover to keep the soil moist, rocks and ground cover is better.