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Past Photos of the Week

Every Tuesday, the Philadelphia Zoo posts its Photo of the Week! Here is a collection of some of our past Photos of the Week. You can view this week's here (under the "Photos" tab): http://www.philadelphiazoo.org/Explore/Photos-Videos.htm

Family groups of common zebras bond together to form large herds that may number in the tens of thousands. Photo by Lisa Gemmill.

Explore - Philadelphia Zoo

philadelphiazoo.org

Amur tigers have a think coat of fur and a layer of fat up to 2 inches thick on their belly and flanks help them tolerate temperatures as low as -45 degrees Fahrenheit. This moment was captured by Jaime McQuade.

Mongoose lemurs are extremely agile, capable of leaping several yards to cross from one tree to another. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Jennifer Vatza.

Humboldts have superb swimming skills rivaling seals and porpoises. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Marianne Leone.

They are very active and sometimes float at the water surface, showing their soft, strikingly colored belly as a warning to potential fishes that might try to eat them. This moment was capture by Camera Club member Janet Miner.

The Navajo-churro sheep that lives in KidZooU is named Nakai. That means "one who wonders" in the Navajo language. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Stan Horowitz.

Pygmy lorises travel along branches moving hand over foot and are very difficult to detect among the dense vegetation. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Karin Helstrom.

An Amur leopard’s fur is reddish-yellow in the summer and becomes lighter in the winter to blend in with the snow. This moment was captured by Camera Club Member Jeff Linder.

Amur leopard - Philadelphia Zoo

philadelphiazoo.org

Except for a small tuft of hair on their heads, newborn gibbons are hairless.This moment was captured by Camera Club member Sharon Sipple.

Orangutans build a nest of branches and leaves in a tree each evening and also sometimes during the day. Orangutan Awareness Week is November 10 through November 16. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Kevin Buynie.

Polar bears have a transparent eyelid that work like a pair of sunglasses filtering out the excessive brightness of snow and sun. They also work as waterproof goggles underwater. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Lisa Gemmill.

Bald eagles construct the largest nest of all North American birds. Eagles are known to reuse nests for many years, both by same individuals as well as different individuals. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Craig Lewis.

The flamingo’s pink color comes from the food they eat, including algae, small aquatic insects and crustaceans (like pink shrimp). This moment was captured by Camera Club member Becky Pischl.

Caribbean flamingo - Philadelphia Zoo

philadelphiazoo.org

Rats can make very good pets. Unlike many other small rodents, rats seem to demonstrate an interest in humans and can become quite closely bonded with a pet owner. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Nicky Decorte.

Wild orangutans are primarily arboreal—they spend most of their time high in the trees. They are the only members of the great ape family to spend most of their time off the ground. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Sharon Sipple.

Kangaroos can cruise for long distances at 30mph due to their efficient hopping, which uses less energy and requires less effort by the kangaroo than running would. They are so well designed for hopping that they can't move their legs independently in atypical walking motion, and cannot walk backwards at all. This moment was captured by Camera Club Member Winnie Chung.

Red pandas exhibit several visual displays when meeting each other, including arching the tail and back, the slow raising and lowering of the head, emitting a low intensity puffing, turning the head while jaw-clapping, shaking the head from side to side and staring. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Ronald Rothman.

Red panda - Philadelphia Zoo

philadelphiazoo.org

Male Panamanian golden frogs can be seen waving their hands to each other, literally saying “stop, don’t get any closer, this is my place”. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Michael Jennings.

Panamanian golden frog - Philadelphia Zoo

philadelphiazoo.org

Polar bears have very good eyesight and hearing although their sense of smell is their most highly developed sense. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Nicky Decorte.

Although they spend the day in water, hippos don’t eat water plants. They travel miles on land at night to graze on grass. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Maria Eble.

Gorillas may live as long as 50 years in zoos, with a more typical lifespan being around 34 years of age. The Philadelphia Zoo's Massa held the longevity record of 54 years at the time of his death in 1984. This moment was captured by Camera Club Member Patti Matthias.

Red river hogs are good swimmers - they can even dive and swim short distances underwater. This moment was captured by Camera Club Member Jeff Linder.

No two tigers have the same stripe pattern. Just as humans are identified through their own unique fingerprints, tigers are identified by their individual stripe patterns. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Linda Pedersen.

Giraffe necks have seven vertebrae, the same as humans do. This amazing adaptation allows them to reach food in tall trees that is not accessible to other browsers. This moment was captured by Camera Club Member Sharon Sipple

Hippos are at home in the water and can stay underwater up to five minutes. They can even sleep underwater, surfacing to take a breath as involuntarily as breathing itself. This moment was captured by Camera Club member Winnie Chung.