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1800-1820 Regency - Footwear

"The Graces Comparing Sandals" Three women in regency dress, two standing and displaying their sandals to the third, who sits on the left; with a dressing table to left in front of a window, and a landscape on the wall. 1798 British Museum 2010,7081.1106

The Graces Comparing Sandals

britishmuseum.org

Coronation Slippers: 1829, silk atlas, embellished with sequins, glazed linen, glazed cowhide. Belonged to Queen Desideria of Sweden/Norway (8 November 1777 – 17 December 1860).

LSH | Kröningssko

emuseumplus.lsh.se

Boots, pair, womens, silk/morocco/linen and storage bag, cotton, England, c. 1825. The boots feature a yellow morocco galosh and yellow silk leg, with 10 pairs of worked holes. One of the boots is threaded with yellow cord lace. The boots have no tongue, are trimmed with a yellow bow at the throat and are partially lined in linen, with a linen sock. Powerhouse museum

These boots are said to have been worn by the great actress, Sarah Siddons (1755-1831). V&A

Sarah Siddons' boots | V&A

vam.ac.uk

c1810 beige canvas boots. Sole detail. Straight soles with nailed heels. So designed for practicality. Length 8 1/2in, width 2 1/2 in. Typically tiny Regency size.

c1810 beige canvas boots. OP says: "They are front-lacing. Made for everyday wear out of canvas outer and linen inner, definitely not fine boots. Straight soles and nailed heels. Notice the real mud stains around the base! I know that late Victorian bathing boots look similar, but I think these are 'right' for the Regency era."

c1810 beige canvas boots. Front-lacing, straight-soled. They are made up of pieces of canvas, as though to use every single scrap of fabric. Everyday boots, not fine ones. They are a bit like modern Converse boots!

c1810 beige canvas boots. Detail showing the different quality of canvas for the shoe and ankle parts of the boot. The shoe part is finer. They are actually very waterproof.

c1810 beige canvas boots. Detail of the front-lacing. Not sure if the laces are original, they may well be. I understand that they may not be correctly laced; the lace being treated as two threads, not one (see image of Sarah Siddon's boots). But then the Ackermann print shows cross-lacing.

c1810 beige canvas boots. Showing the boot unlaced and the tongue at full length. The long tongue is only attached at the base. The tongue is lined in coarse linen.

c1810 beige canvas boots. OP says: "I was so pleased to find these. They are everyday boots, not fine boots. They even have Regency mud stains around the base! I don't think the fabric is posh 'nankin', just canvas."

Pair of Woman's Slippers England, circa 1795-1810 Costumes; Accessories Kid leather, leather, linen Length: 10 in. (25.4 cm) each Mrs. Alice...

Pair of Woman's Slippers | LACMA Collections

collections.lacma.org

1795-1815 Ankle Boots-Leather-Eur / Met 2009.300.3511a–d

Boots | European | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

Two Nerdy History Girls: A Rare Pair of Embroidered Silk Sandals, c. 1805

Two Nerdy History Girls: A Rare Pair of Embroidered Silk Sandals, c. 1805

1816 Costume Parisien. Hat of velvet. Carrick (caped overcoat) and gaiters (boots?) of wool.

1814 Costume Parisien. Hat of straw. Gown of printed material. English boots.

Pair of woman's shoes with toe protectors. French, about 1810-1830, in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. ["Toe protectors"? They look similar to 18th c. pattens.]

Lemon yellow kid leather slippers, c. 1790's. With elongated pointed toes, cream silk looped ribbon decoration, and forward slanting side seams. The top edges and back seams are all bound with silk ribbon. Low shaped lemon leather heels and brown leather straight soles. Lining of slightly glazed linen.

1790s two-tone blue leather pointed shoes. White leather low heels. Embroidered cut-outs and silk ribbon rosette. Lined in linen.