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Etruscan ~768-264 BCE

Jewelry and Lapidary work from the Etruscan culture, which covered a large section of what is now modern Italy. It evolved from and superceded the Villanovan culture, and was finally absorbed/annexed by the early Romans.

Etruscan granulated gold brooch with pearls, glass and cloisonne enamel C.550BCE, Cervetery, Etruria

Scarab Carved in Intaglio with a Pig-Man "Etruscan", ca 5th century BC

Two Etruscan carved intaglio scarab seal stones.

Etruscan Carnelian Scarab Ring

Etruscan ear-stud (530–480 BCE) decorated with a rosette surrounded by concentric bands, globules and flowers. Gold with vitreous glass paste insets.

Bronze vessel of Etruscan or Rhodian craftship found in a mound at Graeckwyl, Switzerland, dated to the 7th century bce. The winged goddess is flanked by four lions, the upper two resting on two snakes that emerge from her head. An eagle sits on her head, and she holds two hares in her hands.

AN ETRUSCAN CARNELIAN SCARAB CIRCA LATE 5TH-4TH CENTURY B.C. The beetle well detailed, with V-shaped winglets and a hatched plinth, the underside engraved with a nude satyr seizing a draped woman, the satyr leaning forward, his arms around her, his head at her chest, the woman, perhaps a maenad, with her head turned back, a thyrsos in her hand, enclosed within a hatched border 11/16 in. (1.7 cm.) long

AN ETRUSCAN BANDED AGATE RING STONE CIRCA 4TH-3RD CENTURY B.C. The flat oval stone engraved with Achilles mourning the death of Patroklos, the hero seated on a folding stool, wearing a helmet and a dotted himation around his legs and over his left arm, leaning forward, his right arm bent at the elbow and resting on his thigh, his sheathed sword projecting behind, enclosed within a hatched border 15/16 in. (2.3 cm.) long

A PAIR OF ETRUSCAN GOLD A BAULE EARRINGS CIRCA 5TH CENTURY B.C.

Gold, glass and onyx Necklace Etruscan, Italy 480-460 BC

Gold finger-ring; rounded hoop, covered with fine twisted gold wires; at either end is soldered a ring of leaves and a palmette in filigree; deep oval bezel with a filigree design of rosettes and spirals (partly broken away); the sides of the bezel are decorated with tendrils in filigree within twisted wires; on the underside of the bezel are the remains, of four palmettes in filigree arranged round a hole.

Image gallery: finger-ring

britishmuseum.org

Gold finger-ring; rounded hoop, covered with fine twisted gold wires; at either end is soldered a ring of leaves and a palmette in filigree; deep oval bezel with a filigree design of rosettes and spirals (partly broken away); the sides of the bezel are decorated with tendrils in filigree within twisted wires; on the underside of the bezel are the remains, of four palmettes in filigree arranged round a hole.

British Museum - finger-ring

britishmuseum.org

Necklace, Etruscan, 5th C BC - 2nd C BC. The British Museum

Gem Engraved with a Two-Horse Chariot and Driver (Getty Museum); carnelian and gold. Etruscan, 400 - 300 B.C.

Gem Engraved with a Two-Horse Chariot and Driver (Getty Museum)

getty.edu

Fibula (Pin), gold, Italy, Etruscan, 4th century BC - The Cleveland Museum of Art

Collections Online

clevelandart.org

Straight Pin, gold and glass, Etruscan, Italy, circa 500 BC - The Cleveland Museum of Art

Pair of Disk Earrings (Getty Museum); gold. Etruscan, circa 525-500 BC

Reel with representations of Pegasus and Chimaira, probably an ear-stud. Gold with filigree, granulation and stamping decoration, early 4th century BC. Origin is uncertain: the shape refers to Southern Italy whereas the granulation is specific to Etruscan jewellery.

Etruscan Necklace with Relief Pendants, gold, silver, glass, zinc-copper alloy. Circa 7th-6th century BC

Spiral Fibula - Fibulae (pins) with wire spirals were common in Greece, South Italy, and the Picene area of eastern Italy. The Italic examples, like this one, commonly have a separate clasp element to which the spirals are attached, while in the Greek examples the pin and catch are formed from the ends of the spiral wires themselves. Etruscan, 9th-8th century BC, bronze

Ring, late 6th–early 5th century b.c., Etruscan, Gilt silver. This ring testifies to the complexity of artistic interconnection at the end of the Archaic period. The bezel is in the form of a cartouche, a shape ultimately of Egyptian origin that the Phoenicians disseminated in the western Mediterranean. The three mythological creatures that decorate it—winged lion, siren, and scarab beetle—came from the East as well.