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Constellations

Pictures related to my stories about constellations at http://www.bellaonline.com/subjects/6965.asp

Table Mountain in the clouds. (Credit: ijshoorn). Table Mountain near Cape Town, South Africa was the inspiration for Lacaille's constellation Mensa. The Large Magellanic Cloud represents the clouds often seen on the mountaintop.

Panoramio - Photo of Table Mountain in the clouds

panoramio.com

Mensa, introduced by Lacaille under the name Mons Mensae, as illustrated in the Uranographia of Johann Bode (1801). Nubecula Major is the Large Magellanic Cloud, representing the cloud that caps the real Table Mountain.

Star Tales – Mensa

ianridpath.com

Octans encompasses the south celestial pole, as shown here in the Uranographia of Johann Bode where it was called Octans Nautica. The octant was the forerunner of the modern sextant.

Star Tales – Octans

ianridpath.com

Pyxis hovers over the mast of Argo in the Uranographia of Johann Bode (1801). The compass would have been useful to Jason and his Argonauts, but it wasn't known to the ancient Greeks.

Star Tales – Pyxis

ianridpath.com

Norma, shown under the name Norma et Regula (set square and ruler) in the Uranographia of Johann Bode (1801). One of the constellations of Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille.

Star Tales – Norma

ianridpath.com

Mensa, introduced by Lacaille under the name Mons Mensae, as illustrated in the Uranographia of Johann Bode (1801). Nubecula Major is the Large Magellanic Cloud, representing the cloud that caps the real Table Mountain.

Star Tales – Mensa

ianridpath.com

Circinus from the Uranographia of Johann Bode, with Triangulum Australe to its left and Norma (the set square and ruler) just off the top of the picture. Circinus and Norma are two constellations invented by 18th century astronomer Nicolas Lacaille.

Star Tales – Circinus

ianridpath.com

On his 1756 planisphere Nicolas Louis de Lacaille showed Caelum as a pair of crossed engraving tools tied together with a ribbon. He named the constellation les Burins. This was Latinized to Caelum Scalptorium on the second edition of the chart in 1763. This illustration comes from a copy of Lacaille’s original map published in the Atlas Céleste of Jean Fortin. (Image © Ian Ridpath.)

Lacaille’s Caelum

ianridpath.com

Argo Navis was a constellation representing Jason's ship as he went in search of the golden fleece. Here the constellation is depicted by Hevelius. Nicolas Louis Lacaille divided this very large constellation into three parts. (Image © Tartu Observatory Virtual Museum)

Where is Aries? Find the Great Square of Pegasus - nearly overhead, & the Pleiades star cluster low in the east. Aries is midway between them. Look for a small, curved line of three stars. They are Alpha, Beta and Gamma Arietis.

Whassup in the Milky Way?: The Reclusive Ram

whassupinthemilkyway.blogspot.co.uk

Officina Typographica (Printing Office). Now obsolete constellation invented by Johann Bode for his star atlas Uranographia. Mona Evans, "Bode and Bode's Law" www.bellaonline.c...

Globus Aerostaticus (Hot Air Balloon). An obsolete consolation invented by Johann Bode for his star atlas Uranographia. Mona Evans, "Bode and Bode's Law" www.bellaonline.c...

The Teapot asterism that shows Sagittarius is marked on this image. You can also see a part of the Great Rift running down the page. This is composed of dark, dusty clouds that obscure our view of the Galactic disk. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Equines" www.bellaonline.c...

ScienceSouth - Tony's Astronomy Corner

sciencesouthastronomy.blogspot.co.uk

The constellation Equuleus peeking out from behind Pegasus, as depicted in Urania's Mirror. Equuleus the colt may be the brother or the son of Pegasus - traditions vary. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Equines" www.bellaonline.c...

Follow the arc (of the handle of the Big Dipper) to Arcturus and speed on to Spica. Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes (the kite-shaped constellation). Once you find bright Spica, you have Virgo. "Virgo the Maiden" www.bellaonline.c...

Virgo. Shown with wheat sheaf in left hand (Spica) and palm frond in right hand. (From 19th century Urania's Mirror.) "Virgo the Maiden" www.bellaonline.c...

Virgo. Taken from New Mexico, March 2013. (Image credit: Alan Dyer) "Virgo the Maiden" www.bellaonline.c...

Virgo from New Mexico | Amazing Sky Astrophotography by Alan Dyer

amazingsky.photoshelter.com

GEMINI THE TWINS. Zodiac Building, Bucharest. And an astropoem: Two beautiful stars / and the Geminid meteor shower / which annually announces that / Castor and Pollux / have remained Olympic champions / in the heavens. (Image & poem: Andrei Dorian Gheorghe) Mona Evans, "Gemini - the Celestial Twins" www.bellaonline.c...

Gemini. You can see why Gemini is sometimes described as "over Orion's left shoulder." This map shows Castor and Pollux, Mekbuda, NGC 2392 and M35, among other features of Gemini. Mona Evans, "Gemini - the Celestial Twins" www.bellaonline.c...

The constellation Gemini the Twins represents the brothers, Castor and Pollux, in an embrace. (Created with Stellarium) Mona Evans, "Gemini - the Celestial Twins" www.bellaonline.c...

The Big Dipper is part of Ursa Major, the celestial Great Bear. Ursa Major is a constellation. The Big Dipper (the Plough in Britain) is an asterism. (Image via storybookipedia) Mona Evans, "Asterism or Constellation?" www.bellaonline.c...

Constellation Lyra. (credit: Urania's Mirror) This is the harp of the legendary Orpheus whose music charmed even wild beasts. Mona Evans, "Lyra the Heavenly Harp" www.bellaonline.c...

Lyra. The constellation represents the harp of Orpheus whose sweet music music charmed even the lord of the Underworld Hades. Vega is one of the brightest stars in the sky. Mona Evans, "Lyra the Heavenly Harp" www.bellaonline.c...

Constellations of the northern hemisphere August sky. The stars are connected in their traditional patterns and the dotted lines show the IAU boundaries for each one. (Credit: Astro Bob) Mona Evans, "Constellation or Asterism?" www.bellaonline.c...

Monoceros and Canis Minor. Urania's Mirror, based on Alexander Jamieson's Celestial Atlas. (Credit: Ian Ridpath) Mona Evans "Monoceros the Unicorn" www.bellaonline.c...