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Space Exploration

Pictures related to my article "Ten Fascinating Facts about Space Exploration" at http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art29541.asp.

▶ First Orbit - the movie. On April 12, 1961 Yuri Gagarin saw what no human had ever seen before: the Earth from space. "First Orbit" allows you to imagine that you are making the historic voyage. Film shot from the International Space Station creates the views, but you'll also have Philip Sheppard's music. Mona Evans, "First Orbit - Film Review" www.bellaonline.c...

An interesting infographic about John Glenn. He wasn't the first American in space - or even the first American human in space! But he was the first American to orbit the Earth. Glenn was preceded by Soviet cosmonauts Yuri Gagarin and Gherman Titov.

Mars One mission infographic. If you wanted to go to Mars and not come back, they're not accepting any more applications. But the infographic explains the plan. It might make you think that you'd prefer to pass on this anyhow. You can learn more about space flight in Mary Roach's book "Packing for Mars". This review will tell you about it: www.bellaonline.c...

ISS infographic - Happy 15th Birthday. The first International Space Station component, the Russian Zarya module, was launched 15 years ago today, on November 20, 1998. Since then, a consortium of 15 different nations have constructed a world-class orbiting laboratory, with a continual human presence onboard since 2000. Construction was considered officially complete in 2011, but new modules are still planned.

Tranquility Base. (Credit: LRO, NASA) Neil Armstrong & Buzz Aldrin landed here on 20 July 1969. LRO found the lunar module and equipment that Aldrin had put out, such as the reflector (LRRR) for bouncing laser beams to measure the distance to the Moon. A faint trail in the lunar dust marked Armstrong's path to a nearby crater called Little West. Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Aldrin putting out such as the lunar ranging retro reflector (LRRR) for bouncing laser beams to measure the distance to the Moon, and the passive seismic experiment (PSE) for detecting Moonquakes. Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Apollo 12 tracks. (Photo: LRO, NASA) Tracks made by Pete Conrad and Alan Bean as they walked from their lunar module Intrepid, finally circling the crater rim to the dormant Surveyor 3, an old unmanned probe. They snipped off the Surveyor's camera and brought it back to Earth. Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Apollo 14 at Fra Mauro. Alan Shepard & Edgar Mitchell were meant to walk from their lunar module to the rim of an impact feature called Cone Crater, but it took them longer than expected. Unsure of their bearings, they took samples at a broken boulder nicknamed Saddle Rock before turning back. From the LRO pictures we can see they were only about 100 feet away from the rim of Cone Crater. (Credit: LRO, NASA) Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Hadley Rille, at the end of July 1971. Apollo 15 was the first to use a battery-powered Moon car, called the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The astronauts could explore more widely, including going to the edge of the rille. (Photo: LRO, NASA) Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Landing site of Apollo 16. It was the only Apollo mission to visit the lunar highlands, touching down near a crater called Descartes. This picture of the site was taken with the Sun almost directly overhead. The overhead lighting emphasizes the dark halos around the lunar module and the lunar rover where John Young and Charles Duke churned up the soil with their feet. (Photo: LRO, NASA) Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Apollo 15 landing area. (Photo: LRO, NASA) The lunar rover is parked on one side of the lunar module Falcon, with some scientific experiments and a laser reflector on the other side. Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Landing site of Apollo 17, the last Apollo mission. Gene Cernan & Jack Schmitt spent 75 hours on the Moon and drove for some 35 km (22 miles) around the landing site. An enlargement of the descent stage of their lunar module even shows the two Portable Life Support System backpacks (PLSS) from their Moon suits, discarded to save weight before take-off. (Photo: LRO, NASA) Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Neil Armstrong. The first human to set foot on another heavenly body. As the world watched on July 20, 1969, he said, "One small step for a man. One giant leap for mankind," and stepped down. Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

Saturn V F-1 engine thrust Chamber from the first stage of the vehicle that launched Apollo 11. The first stage had 5 F-1 engines, one of the most powerful rocket engines ever made. Each had more power than all three space shuttle main engines combined. This engine was recovered from the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. (Credit: Jeff Bezos Expeditions) Ian Ridpath, "Exploring the Apollo Landing Sites", www.bellaonline.c...

ISS pass over Stonehenge, Wiltshire UK, April 20, 2013. (Credit and copyright: Tim Burgess) A composite image of 11 shots.

First Orbit. The flight of Yuri Gagarin on Apr 12, 1961. Sven Grahn's annotated map of the Vostok's route. Kedr (Siberian pine) was Gagarin's call sign. The call sign for the ground was Zarya (dawn), so Z1, Z2 and Z3 represent these stations. Mona Evans, "First Orbit - film review" www.bellaonline.c...

Golden orb spider on board the International Space Station in 2011. Gladys and Esmeralda were a pair of spiders which were studied to see how they adpated to microgravity. (I don't know which one is in this photo!) (Photo: BioServe) ©Mona Evans,”Spiders in Space” www.bellaonline.c...

The sea is Neil Armstrong's final resting place. Burial service aboard the USS Philippine Sea, September 14, 2012. (image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

July 20, 1969. Neil Armstrong stood on the lander's ladder, uttered his words about the giant leap, and stepped onto the Moon. Here is the first picture he took as he began to document our satellite. "In the Shadow of the Moon - film review" www.bellaonline.c...

Neil Armstrong (1930-2012). The first human being ever to step on another world. In this picture he's just about to take that step. ©Mona Evans, "In the Shadow of the Moon - film review" www.bellaonline.c...

Sally Kristen Ride (May 26, 1951 – July 23, 2012). In an age where people are famous for being famous, Ride was an inspiration. Her fame was just a by-product of achieving what she wanted to do. She was the first American woman in space, chosen as a mission specialist because of her experience with the robot arm which she had helped to design. After NASA she entered academia, and set up a company to devise science education programs to inspire young people.

NASA | LRO Brings "Earthrise" to Everyone. On Christmas Eve 1968 the Apollo 8 astronauts were the first humans to see Earth rise over the Moon. Iconic is an overused word, but this image surely is. NASA Goddard used hi res footage from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and historical footage to recreate the moments when Lovell, Anders & Borman saw our planet appear from behind the Moon. ©Mona Evans, "Ten Fascinating Facts about Space Exploration" www.bellaonline.c...