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More like this: glutinous rice, indian desserts and bangkok.

In Burma, paratha is commonly eaten as a dessert, sprinkled with sugar.

Mote Lone Yay Paw (Teething Cake) is a popular Burmese cake that is prepared in celebration of a baby's first tooth.

Yoghurt with Palm Sugar (Burmese: Dain Jin Tinyet Yeh Neq, lit: "Yoghurt mixed with palm sugar")

Gyalebi - Burmese version of India's Jalebi - a bright orange kind of funnel cake.

Kauk Mote (Burmese Folded Pancake of Red Beans & Coconut)

Burmese sweet coconut rice - More sweet, more sticky comparing to Thai, almost like candy.

Shwe gyi mont - Hardened semolina (wheat) porridge cake with poppy seeds, sugar, butter, coconut.

Burmese Wrapped Bananas (Kauknyintok). Bananas steamed in a banana leaf with coconut cream and sesame seeds.

Burmese Nan ka htaing - Kind of Indian cake made of flour, sugar and butter.

Burmese Mont Sein Paung (steamed rice cake), and Mont leik pyar (hin rice dough skins with a centre filled with jaggery and coconut, and folded in squares).

Burmese Food Fair: Night Market Shaved Ice.

Burmese Pashu mont (similar to Malay Kuih) Confection of roasted glutinous rice flour mixed with sugar and coconut shreds.

Burmese shwe htamin (sweetened glutinous rice and jaggery garnished with coconut shavings).

Burmese Flan - Rangoon, Burma (Yangon, Myanmar).

A Burmese version of “Marzipan” – sugar and bean flour shaped candies.

Dried fruits are a bit of a luxury dessert in Burma and they are quite tasty.

fresh fruit at a Burmese market: strawberries.

Burmese Bread Pudding

Htamanè - Burmese savory dessert made from glutinous rice, fried shredded coconuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, oil.

Mont kalama (dodol) Burmese toffee-like delicacy made of coconut milk, jaggery, and rice flour.

Burmese Mango Cake, set with gelatin.

Burmese Wrapped Bananas (Kauknyintok). Bananas steamed in a banana leaf with coconut cream and sesame seeds.

Thagu-Pyin (palm sugar sago) is a light and delicious dessert to end a good Burmese meal.

htaw hbut dhi yea kare mot - The literal translation for avocado in Burmese is butter fruit. Avocados always remind me of a treat we used to eat in Burma and one that I particularly enjoy, an avocado shake. It was simply made with a ripe avocado, milk, a little condensed milk and sugar, resulting in a rich frothy drink. I have adapted this recipe into an ice cream which can be served as a dessert or a treat any time of day.

Burmese coconut agar jelly (Kyaukchaw).