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In 1987, Dr. Benjamin Carson gained worldwide recognition for his part in the first successful separation of Siamese twins joined at the back of the head. The extremely complex and delicate operation, five months in the planning and twenty-two hours in the execution, involved a surgical plan that Carson helped initiate. Carson pioneered again in a rare procedure known as hemispherectomy, giving children without hope a second chance at life through a daring operation in which he literally remo...

ames West attended Temple University before working for Bell Labs. Along with Gerhard M. Sessler, he developed the foil electret microphone, an inexpensive, compact device that is now used in 90 percent of all contemporary microphones. A prolific writer as well, West has more than 250 patents and became a professor at Johns Hopkins University. More information by clicking picture.

René Lacoste (1904-1996), winner of 7 major tennis titles and nicknamed the "crocodile" by his friends, developed the first tennis ball machine and the first metal racket, and began a little clothing line in 1933-black history archives

African American Inventors List | ... inventions size 6x14 each black inventors and their inventions african

Thomas Moore, a Maryland farmer, first coined the term "refrigerator" in 1803, but the refrigeration technique has been around for centuries. Many new models and inventions contributed to the development of the modern refrigerator. In 1879, Thomas Elkins, an African American inventor in Albany, New York, patented his Refrigerating Apparatus.

Joseph Lee was born in 1849 and lived MA. Lee looked for another way of improving food preparation and invented an automatic bread making machine. The machine not only mixed the ingredients, but also kneaded the dough. The machine was so fast and efficient it was able to perform the tasks of 5 or 6 men and did so more hygienically and at a much cheaper cost. It also produced a higher quality product, with a much better taste and texture. He received a patent for the machine.

In 1966 the idea for a Home Surveillance System was invented by Marie Van Brittan Brown & her partner Albert Brown (they applied for a Patent for the 1st Closed Circuit TV Security System (forerunner to the modern home security system). Ms Brown's system had 4 Peep Holes & a camera that slid up & down & whatever it caught appeared on a monitor. Their invention ALSO INCLUDED A REMOTE That would unlock a door. Because of her invention today's market is Flooded w/home security systems.

Mark E. Dean (born March 2, 1957) is an African American inventor and a computer engineer. He led the team that developed the ISA bus, and he led the design team responsible for creating the first[citation needed] one-gigahertz computer processor chip.[1] Dean has also helped in the early development of the computer keyboard. He holds three of IBM's original nine PC patents. In August 2011, writing in his blog, Dean stated that he now uses a tablet computer instead of a PC.

Dr. Frank Crossley is a pioneer in the field of titanium metallurgy. He began his work in metals at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago after receiving his graduate degrees in metallurgical engineering. In the 1950s, few African Americans were visible in the engineering fields, but Frank Crossley excelled in his field. He received seven patents, five in titanium base alloys that greatly improved the aircraft and aerospace industry.

Congress Woman Cynthia McKinney

Verone Mankou is the genius creator behind the Way-C tablet computer. The tablet is called the Way-C - "the light of the stars" in a dialect of northern Congo. Meet the Way-C, the first African tablet to rival the iPad, created by a young inventor with dreams of bringing internet access to the masses.

This undated photo provided by WABC-TV in New York shows news broadcaster Gil Noble, who died Thursday, April 5, 2012 at the age of 80. Nobile had suffered a debilitating stroke last summer. Noble’s career spanned more than five decades. He started as a reporter at the station in 1967. The following year, he became host of “Like It Is,” a public affairs program that focused on issues concerning African-Americans. (AP Photo/WABC-TV)

AFRICAN INVENTOR: In 2010, BERTIN NAHUM, from Benin, created ROSA, a robot that helps surgeons performs brain surgery. This invention, used in hospital around the world, made him the 4TH most revolutionary high-tech entrepreneurs in the world; after Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg and James Cameron! He is also the CEO of Medtech, a French company which specialize in robotic surgical assistance.

Octavia Butler --- (June 22, 1947 – February 24, 2006) was an American science fiction writer. A recipient of both the Hugo and Nebula awards, Butler was one of the best-known African-American women in the field. In 1995, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant.

Thomas L. Jennings (1791-1859) A tailor in New York City, Jennings is credited with being the first African American to hold a U.S. patent. The patent, which was issued in 1821, was for a dry-cleaning process.

David Crosthwait was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1913 went to work for the Durham Company designing heating installations. Crosthwait holds 39 U.S. patents for heating systems, vacuum pumps, refrigeration methods and processes and temperature regulating devices, and 80 international patents for the same.He received a Bachelor of Science degree and a Master of Engineering degree from Purdue University

Marie Van Brittan Brown. First person to develop the patent for closed circuit television security; motorized camera and four peepholes. The camera could be moved from one peephole to the next, and images were displayed on a monitor. The door could also be unlocked remotely using an electrical switch. Brown’s invention was patented in 1969, and became the framework for the modern closed circuit television system that is widely used for surveillance, crime prevention, and traffic monitoring

Bath is the first African American woman doctor to receive a patent for a medical purpose. Her Laserphaco Probe is used to treat cataracts. The holder of four patents, she is also the founder of the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness in Washington D.C. Patricia Era Bath, born November 4,1942, Harlem, New York, attended Howard University College of Medicine where she received her doctoral degree in 1968. While there she was president of the Student National Medical Association.

Dr. Ben Carson to Mark Levin: ‘Vicious white liberals are the most racist’; Vicious libs prove him right | Twitchy