Categories
Log in
There’s more to see...
Sign up to see the rest of what’s here!

Titanic keys that could have saved the ship. The keys were in the possession of second officer David Blair, who forgot to pass them on to the person who ended up replacing him on the Titanic’s voyage. As we all know, thanks to James Cameron, no one was able to get to the binoculars, and as a result the ship met an untimely fate at the sharp edges of an iceberg.

Keys That Could've Saved The Titanic Sold For $149,000

gizmodo.com.au

April 1997, Memphis, Tennessee, USA --- A spittoon recovered from the wreck of the RMS Titanic is displayed at an exhibition in Memphis, Tennessee.

These spoons, salvaged from the wreckage of the Titanic on the ocean floor, were part of an exhibit at the Maritime Aquarium, in South Norwalk, Conn., Feb. 1, 2002. RMS Titanic, Inc. is the sole salvage company allowed to remove items from the ocean floor where the luxury liner sank in the North Atlantic. (Douglas Healey/Associated Press)

A locket containing two photographs, one of his wife and the other of their daughter, belonging to Edward Herbert Keeping, a personal valet who died on the Titanic, is pictured in this undated handout image received by Reuters March 26, 2012. The locket was officially recorded by the provincial coroner of Nova Scotia before it was returned to his wife, and is contained in the record of bodies and effects: passengers and crew of S.S. Titanic (Body No. 45), public archives of Nova Scotia.

This watch was found on the body of John Starr March, an American mail clerk on Titanic. It probably stopped when the ship sank in the Atlantic.

Money found on titanic

Wooden clarinet recovered from the Titanic

Wooden Clarinet | Titanic Artifacts | Comcast.net

xfinity.comcast.net

Titanic Artifact: This steel and brass bedpost was from one of the better first-class cabins.

Though it seemed like a pretty piece of fiction created by James Cameron, it turns out that there was a diamond and sapphire necklace on board that fatal night, given to a young girl, Kate Florence Phillips, 20, by her married paramour, Henry Samuel Morley, 40.

Titanic 100th Anniversary:

communities.washingtontimes.com

This pocket watch was recovered from a body during the recovery effort. The Titanic sank at 2:20 am. Notice the watch stopped 15 minutes later and never ran again.

Titanic Collector.com - Recovered Items - Pocket Watch

titaniccollector.com

These whistles, recovered from Titanic, are apparently the largest ever made.

Whistles | Titanic Artifacts | Comcast.net

xfinity.comcast.net

Doll head photographed in Sept. 1985. The doll's head is made of bisque porcelain. The eyes were glass and the ears were pierced. The doll was worth about 40.00 Dollars at the time of Titanic's sinking, a considerable sum at that time.

The dollar bill was carried by 50-year old August (Augustus) H. Weikman of Palmyra, New Jersey, a barber on the ship, who was helping crew members launch lifeboats from an upper deck when one of the ship’s boilers exploded and he was blown into the water. But Weikman survived and later wrote on the back the dollar bill: “This note was in my pocket when picked up out of the sea by ‘S.S. Carpathia’ from the wreck of ‘S.S. Titanic’ April 15th 1912/A.H. Weikman/Palmyra, N.J.”

~A locket containing two photographs, one of his wife and the other of their daughter, belonging to Edward Herbert Keeping, a personal valet who died on the Titanic, is pictured in this undated handout image received by Reuters March 26, 2012. The locket was officially recorded by the provincial coroner of Nova Scotia before it was returned to his wife, and is contained in the record of bodies and effects: passengers and crew of S.S. Titanic (Body No. 45), public archives of Nova Scotia ~*