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History: England Queen Consorts

The English royal consorts were the spouses of the reigning monarchs of the Kingdom of England who were not themselves monarchs of England.[1] Most of them are women, and held the title of Queen consort; some few are men, whose titles were not consistent, depending upon the circumstances of their spouses' reigns. The Kingdom of England merged with the Kingdom of Scotland in 1707, to form the Kingdom of Great Britain. There have thus been no consorts of England since that date.

Henrietta Maria, Queen Cosort to Charles I

Princess Louise Maximilienne Caroline Emmanuele of Stolberg-Gedern (20 September 1752 – 29 January 1824) was the wife of the Jacobite claimant to the English and Scottish thrones Charles Edward Stuart. She is commonly called Countess of Albany.

Maria Clementina Sobieska (sometimes spelled:[1] Maria Klementyna Sobieska) (1702–1735) was a Polish noblewoman, the granddaughter of the Polish king John III Sobieski. Being one of Europe's wealthiest heiresses, she was betrothed to James Francis Edward Stuart. King George I of Great Britain was opposed to the marriage because he feared that the union might produce heirs to James Francis Edward's claim to his thrones.

Mary of Modena 5 October 1658 – 7 May 1718) was Queen consort of England, Scotland and Ireland as the second wife of King James II and VII. A devout Catholic, Mary became, in 1673, the second wife of James, Duke of York, who later succeeded his older brother Charles II as King James II.

Catherine of Braganza (Catarina Henriqueta; 25 November 1638 – 31 December 1705) was the wife of King Charles II of England. As such, she was the Queen consort of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1662 to 1685. Due to her devotion to the Roman Catholic beliefs in which she had been raised,

Henrietta Maria of France (25 November 1609 – 10 September 1669) was the Queen consort of England, Scotland, and Ireland as the wife of King Charles I. She was mother of two kings, Charles II and James II, and grandmother of two queens and one king, Mary II, William III and Anne of Great Britain, as well as paternal aunt of Louis XIV of France. The North American Province of Maryland was named in her honor, and the name was carried over into the current U.S. state of Maryland.

Anne of Denmark (12 December 1574 – 2 March 1619) was queen consort of Scotland, England, and Ireland as the wife of James VI and I.[2] The second daughter of King Frederick II of Denmark, Anne married James in 1589 at the age of fourteen and bore him three children who survived infancy, including the future Charles I.

Catherine Parr (Katherine, Kateryn, Katheryne or Kathrine); 1512[1] – 5 September 1548) was Queen consort of England and Ireland and the last of the six wives of King Henry VIII of England. She married Henry VIII on 12 July 1543. She was the fourth commoner Henry had taken as his consort, and outlived him. She was also the most-married English queen, as she had a total of four husbands.

Catherine Howard (c. 1518–1524 – 13 February 1542), also spelled Katherine, Katheryn or Kathryn, was the fifth wife of Henry VIII of England, and sometimes known by his reference to her as his "rose without a thorn". However, she was beheaded after less than two years of marriage to Henry on the grounds of treason for committing adultery while married to the King. Catherine was the third of Henry's consorts to have been a commoner.

Anne of Cleves (German: Anna von Jülich-Kleve-Berg, Dutch: Anna van Kleef) (22 September 1515[1] – 16 July 1557) was a German noblewoman and the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England and as such she was Queen of England from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540. The marriage was never consummated, and she was not crowned queen consort. Following the annulment of their marriage, Anne was given a generous settlement by the King, and thereafter referred to as the King's Beloved Sister.

Jane Seymour (c. 1508 – 24 October 1537) was Queen of England as the third wife of King Henry VIII. She succeeded Anne Boleyn as queen consort following the latter's execution for trumped up charges of high treason, incest and adultery in May 1536. She died of postnatal complications less than two weeks after the birth of her only child, a son who reigned as Edward VI.

Anne Boleyn ( /ˈbʊlɪn/, /bəˈlɪn/ or /bʊˈlɪn/);[3][4] c.1501[5] – 19 May 1536) was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of Henry VIII of England and Marquess of Pembroke in her own right.[6] Henry's marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key figure in the political and religious upheaval that was the start of the English Reformation.

Katharine of Aragon (16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536),was Queen consort of England as the first wife of King Henry VIII of England and Princess of Wales as the wife to Arthur, Prince of Wales. In 1507, she also held the position of Ambassador for the Spanish Court in England when her father found himself without one, becoming the first female ambassador in European history.

Elizabeth of York (11 February 1466 – 11 February 1503) was Queen consort of England as spouse of King Henry VII from 1486 until 1503, and mother of King Henry VIII of England. Elizabeth of York is the only English queen to have been a daughter (of Edward IV), sister (of Edward V), niece (of Richard III), wife (of Henry VII), mother (of Henry VIII) and grandmother (on the paternal side of Mary I, Elizabeth I and Edward VI) of English monarchs.

Lady Anne Neville (11 June 1456 – 16 March 1485) was Princess of Wales as the wife of Edward of Westminster and Queen of England as the consort of King Richard III. She held the latter title for less than two years, from 26 June 1483 until her death in March 1485. She had just one son, Edward, whom she outlived.

Elizabeth Woodville (also spelled Wydeville or Widvile; c. 1437[1] – 8 June 1492) was Queen consort of England as the spouse of King Edward IV from 1464 until his death in 1483. Elizabeth was a key figure in the series of dynastic civil wars known as the Wars of the Roses. Her first husband, Sir John Grey of Groby was killed at the Second Battle of St Albans. Her children included the Princes in the Tower and Elizabeth of York; the latter made her the maternal grandmother of Henry VIII.

Margaret of Anjou (French: Marguerite d'Anjou) (23 March 1430 – 25 August 1482) was the wife of King Henry VI of England. As such, she was Queen consort of England from 1445 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471. She also claimed to be Queen consort of France from 1445 to 1453. Born in the Duchy of Lorraine, into the House of Valois-Anjou, Margaret was the second eldest daughter of René I of Naples and Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine.

Catherine of France (27 October 1401 – 3 January 1437 was the Queen consort of England from 1420 until 1422. She was the daughter of King Charles VI of France, wife of Henry V of Monmouth, King of England,[2] mother of Henry VI, King of England and King of France, and through her secret marriage with Owen Tudor, the grandmother of King Henry VII of England. Catherine's older sister, Isabella of Valois, was Queen consort of England from 1396–1399, as the child bride of King Richard II of England.

Joan of Navarre (c. 1370 – 10 June 1437) was a Duchess consort of Brittany and a Queen consort of England. She was the regent of Brittany from 1399 until 1403 during the minority of her son. She was a daughter of King Charles II of Navarre and Joan of France.[1] Her maternal grandparents were John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg. Through marriage she was the Duchess consort of Brittany and later the Queen consort of England when she wed King Henry IV of England.

Isabella of France (9 November 1389 – 13 September 1409) was a Princess of France, daughter of King Charles VI and Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt.[1] She was queen consort of Richard II, King of England, from 1396 to 1399.[2] Isabella's younger sister, Catherine of Valois, was Queen consort of England from 1420–1422, as the wife of King Henry V of England, mother of Henry VI, King of England and grandmother of King Henry VII of England.

Philippa of Hainault, or, Philippe (d'Avesnes) de Hainaut (24 June[1] 1314 – 15 August 1369) was the Queen consort of King Edward III of England.[2] Edward, Duke of Guyenne, her future husband, promised in 1326 to marry her within the following two years.

Isabella of France (1295 – 22 August 1358), sometimes described as the She-wolf of France, was Queen consort of England as the wife of Edward II of England. She was the youngest surviving child and only surviving daughter of Philip IV of France and Joan I of Navarre. Queen Isabella was notable at the time for her beauty, diplomatic skills and intelligence.

Margaret of France (1279 ?[1] – 14 February 1318[1]), a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant, was Queen of England as the second wife of King Edward I.

Eleanor of Castile (1241 – 28 November 1290) was the first queen consort of Edward I of England. She was also Countess of Ponthieu in her own right from 1279 until her death in 1290, succeeding her mother and ruling together with her husband.

Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 – 24/25 June 1291[1]) was Queen consort of England as the spouse of King Henry III of England from 1236 until his death in 1272. Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners.