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Photograph snapped by Curiosity's Navcam camera on sol 777 (Oct. 13) while at %u201CPahrump Hills%u201D, the base of Mount Sharp.

Curiosity Rover Surveys Wind-Rippled Sandy 'Sea' on Mars (Photo)

space.com

An inflatable boat carrying U.S. Navy personnel approaches the Orion boilerplate test device on Aug. 2 off the coast of California.

NASA ECHO II S-131 // From Wikipedia: "Project Echo was the first passive communications satellite experiment. Each of the two American spacecraft, launched in 1960 and 1964, was a metalized balloon satellite acting as a passive reflector of microwave signals. Communication signals were bounced off of them from one point on Earth to another."

This striking photo shows the stringy remains of a high-altitude balloon moments after it burst on Aug. 26, 2013. The balloon, which was part of a suborbital photography project hatched by Kostas Tamateas, is pictured high above northern Greece. The iconic Mount Olympus is visible beneath the clouds at the top left, and the Aegean Sea can be seen to the left of the balloon.Tamateas' project, dubbed SlaRos, uses high-altitude balloons to explore the atmosphere and capture stunning images of ...

This image of lightning over Kuwait was taken by an astronaut aboard the International Space Station on Dec. 12, 2013.

This exoplanet orbits the star Gliese 667 C, which belongs to a triple system. The six Earth-mass exoplanet circulates around its low-mass host star at a distance equal to only 1/20th of the Earth-Sun distance. The host star is a companion to two other low-mass stars, which are seen here in the distance.

This time-lapse, cropped panorama of the Chang'e-3, Yutu Rover landing site shows the last position of the Yutu rover as it heads off to the south, departing the landing site. The image was created by Ken Kremer and Marco Di Lorenzo using Chang'e 3 mission images released via China's state-run news outlets.

This image is a 360-degree panorama of the Chang'e-3, Yutu Rover landing site created by Ken Kremer and Marco Di Lorenzo. It was stitched from six individual pictures released to a state-run China news outlet. The initial panoramic was then enhanced to improve contrast, lighting and uniformity, which revealed more detail.