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Fraser

Fraser

Chris McVeigh posted instructions for building the ultimate geeky christmas ornament - an adorable death star made from legos. Photo via blog.makezine.com

in which John Barrowman sweeps Wil Wheaton off his feet

Diverted Route 86: 9-15 July 2011. If you have ever seen the film Malcolm you will know why I like this image

Molly Quinn from Castle dressed as Mal from Firefly

Something from the blooper reel?

Twitter / NatGeopix: Close Up Shot of Snow Fox. ...

Explanation: What's happening to this spiral galaxy? Just a few hundred million years ago, NGC 2936, the upper of the two large galaxies shown, was likely a normal spiral galaxy -- spinning, creating stars -- and minding its own business. But then it got too close to the massive elliptical galaxy NGC 2937 below and took a dive. Dubbed the Porpoise Galaxy for its iconic shape, NGC 2936 is not only being deflected but also being distorted by the close gravitational interaction.

Explanation: This is Mars -- have a look around. More specifically, this is one area picked for its promise of holding clues to the habitability of Mars to ancient life. To better search for telling leads, the robotic Curiosity rover took a series of detailed images from a location called Rock Nest. Over 900 of these images were then composed into one of the highest resolution images ever created of the red planet -- a composite containing over one billion pixels

The much maligned Leyland P76. This was our family car when growing up.

The Leyland P76 steering wheel and dash. This was our family car when growing up.

Explanation: Except for the rings of Saturn, the Ring Nebula (M57) is probably the most famous celestial band. Its classic appearance is understood to be due to our own perspective, though. The recent mapping of the expanding nebula's 3-D structure, based in part on this clear Hubble image, indicates that the nebula is a relatively dense, donut-like ring wrapped around the middle of a football-shaped cloud of glowing gas.

@Cmdr_Hadfield Our Earth is just simply beautiful. pic.twitter.com/nKfZOX0r4s

Our Sun is not a giant blueberry. Our Sun can be made to appear similar to the diminutive fruit, however, by imaging it in a specific color of extreme violet light called CaK that is emitted by the very slight abundance of ionized Calcium in the Sun's atmosphere, and then false color-inverting the image

@Cmdr_Hadfield Today's photo is a river doing impersonations: Look, I'm a Stag Beetle! pic.twitter.com/yazPFA8mop

What's that in the sky? It is a rarely seen form of lightning confirmed only about 25 years ago: a red sprite. Recent research has shown that following a powerful positive cloud-to-ground lightning strike, red sprites may start as 100-meter balls of ionized air that shoot down from about 80-km high at 10 percent the speed of light and are quickly followed by a group of upward streaking ionized balls

@Cmdr_Hadfield Today's photo is sunrise, the windows glinting and solar array gilded in the unbelievably harsh morning light. pic.twitter.com/zR5zo1AsyB

Explanation: Above this boreal landscape, the arc of the Milky Way and shimmering aurorae flow through the night. Like an echo, below them lies Iceland's spectacular Godafoss, the Waterfall of the Gods. Shining just below the Milky Way, bright Jupiter is included in the panoramic nightscape recorded on March 9.

@Cmdr_Hadfield Today's photo is from the Mongolian highlands. Surreal to see a frozen lake surrounded by sand dunes. pic.twitter.com/InfNHUMc5p

@Earth_Pics Niagra Falls frozen solid in 1911. pic.twitter.com/S5m7IMxjTa

A Supercell Thunderstorm Cloud Over Montana Image Credit & Copyright: Sean R. Heavey Explanation: Is that a spaceship or a cloud? Although it may seem like an alien mothership, it's actually a impressive thunderstorm cloud called a supercell.

Explanation: This week the shadow of the New Moon fell on planet Earth, crossing Queensland's Cape York in northern Australia ... for the second time in six months. On the morning of May 10, the Moon's apparent size was too small to completely cover the Sun though, revealing a "ring of fire" along the central path of the annular solar eclipse. Near mid-eclipse from Coen, Australia, a webcast team captured this telescopic snapshot of the annular phase

Explanation: Sometimes the sky above can become quite a show. In early September of 2010, for example, the Moon and Venus converged, creating quite a sight by itself for sky enthusiasts around the globe. From some locations, though, the sky was even more picturesque. In the above image taken in Spain,

@Cmdr_Hadfield Spaceships glowing blue in the dawn as we leave Florida headed across the Atlantic. pic.twitter.com/GzEoCg2bb5

That's my guy holding my gal!

Explanation: It was just eight minutes after sunrise, last week, and already there were four things in front of the Sun. The largest and most notable was Earth's Moon, obscuring a big chunk of the Sun's lower limb as it moved across the solar disk, as viewed from Fremantle, Australia. This was expected as the image was taken during a partial solar eclipse