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Women's Suffrage

Materials from the fight for the vote

This map by Women's History Matters shows the breakdown of the 1914 women's suffrage vote. Areas where at least half the voters supported wo... via the GreatFallsTribune,com

This coin – a perfectly ordinary penny minted in 1903 – was part of this civil disobedience. Stamped with the suffragette slogan “votes for women”, it circulated as small change, and spread the message of the campaigners.

Advertisement for The Suffragette newspaper. This poster, designed by Mary Bartels, represents the Suffragette as a feminine 'womanly' woman. The Suffragette was launched as the official newspaper of the Women's Social and Political Union in 1912. Its launch represented a split in the Union as Emmeline and Fred Pethick-Lawrence were purged from the leadership by Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. 1914.

On this day in 1920, Congress made history when it ratified the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing all American women the right to vote (official document)

Anti-Suffrage Propaganda

"Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, 1916." One of the banners used in a memorial service for Inez Milholland, the lawyer who became a martyr to the suffrage movement following her death from anemia while campaigning for the 19th Amendment. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative.

Lucy Burns was an American suffragist & women's rights advocate. In 1917 she was imprisoned at Occoquan Workhouse for protesting, picketing, & marching at the White House. She endured the “Night of Terror” by the guards. The women were treated brutally & were refused medical attention. Of the well-known suffragists of the era, Burns spent the most time in jail. Photo by Harris & Ewing. ~Fighting for Our Rights.

Between 1897 and 1911 Elizabeth Smith Miller and her daughter, Anne Fitzhugh Miller, filled seven large scrapbooks with ephemera and memorabilia related to their work with women's suffrage. The Elizabeth Smith Miller and Anne Fitzhugh Miller scrapbooks are a part of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) Collection in the Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

Suffrage parade, New York City, May 6, 1912

Official program woman suffrage procession. Washington, D.C., 1913.