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St. Marks Place, with campanile, Venice, Italy,1890 and 1900

Doge's Palace, Venice

Clock tower (torre dell'Orologio), Piazzetta di San Marco 1890-1900...I see pigeons!

Doge's Palace, Venice

St. Marks Place, with campanile, Venice, Italy,1890 and 1900

The Royal Yacht Hohenzollern in Venice, Italy, ca. 1896

After the collapse of Campanile di San Marco on July 14, 1902: what remained was a huge heap of rubble.

La Marangona, the bell of Campanile di San Marco remained intact during the towers collapse on July 14, 1902.

View from the clock-tower on Piazza San Marco onto the heap of rubble remained from the collapse bell-tower Campanile di San Marco. Over the centuries the Campanile already hat collapsed some times: in 1388 when struck by lightning, and again in 1489. In 1511 it was struck by a violent earthquake.

Over the centuries Campanile di San Marco had always undergone repair works. This is a drawing by Canaletto showing repair works in the 18th century.

After the collapse of Campanile di San Marco on July 14 1902 the city quickly decided to start with the reconstruction: "Dov'era e com'era" (= where it stood and like it was). The reconstruction was finished in 1912, so the reconstructed bell-tower now is 100 years old.

Huge heap of rubble on Piazza di San Marco (Venice, Italy). The remains of Campanile (bell-tower) di San Marco after its collapse on July 14 1902.

Piazza San Marco (Venice, Italy) full of dust and rubble after the collapse of Campanile di San Marco on July 14 1902.

(Real) picture of the heap of rubble that remained after the collapse of Campanile di San Marco on July 14 1902.

A (fake) picture of collapsing Campanile di San Marco by Antonio de Paoli (1902). Nice example of "photshopping" in the early 1900s. On the days before the collapse the tower began to groan, so municipality and citizens were somehow prepared. However those weren't the times of iPhone but glass photo plates and it's unlikely that exactly the moment of the collapse was catched on glass. What exists are montages that illustrate the drama (in which btw no person was killed... however a cat).

Vintage ad by the Italian Tourist Board

View on the Grand Canal (Venice, Italy) around 1901

Venitian landmarks from the air - Photo by Capt. Louis Brullard

Gondolas covered with snow in 1955 (short video)

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in Venice, Italy, in 1951 (short video)