Categories

Come on in! Join Pinterest today...it only takes like a second or so.

In the age of the Vikings (800-1100AD) Scandinavia used a runic alphabet known as Younger Futhark (fuþark). It was made up of 16 sound symbols known as runes. Younger Futhark developed from Elder Futhark (150 to 800 AD), an older form of Germanic language consisting of 24 runes. Both alphabets are called after their first six runes F-U-þ-A-R-K. Younger Futhark is basically the written form of Old Norse – the language of the Vikings.

Blanche of Castile and King Louis IX of France; Author Dictating to a Scribe, Moralized Bible. France, probably Paris, ca. 1230

Free Printables of Initials - Each initial is filled with images starting with that letter.

:'3 I remember...

The first probable instance of the name "Israel" in the archeological record, found on The Merneptah Stele, a black granite slab, 10 ft high, with an inscription of the Ancient Egyptian king Merneptah (1213 to 1203 BCE). The text is largely an account of his victory over the Libyans and their allies, but the last few lines deal with a separate campaign in Canaan, then part of Egypt's imperial possessions, Discovered at Thebes, now housed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

An old-fashioned classroom

The Earliest Known Fragment of the New Testament (Circa 100 CE – 150 CE): A fragment from a papyrus codex known as P52, measuring only 3.5 by 2.5 inches (9 by 6.4 cm) at its widest; and conserved at the John Rylands Library at Manchester, the Saint John Fragment is generally accepted as the earliest extant record of a canonical New Testament text. The front (recto) contains lines from the Gospel of John 18:31-33, in Greek, and the back (verso) contains lines from verses 37-38...

The Great Isaiah Scroll (Circa 100 BCE): The Great Isaiah Scroll is the best-preserved and the only nearly complete scroll in the cache of 220 biblical scrolls discovered in a cave in Qumran on the northwestern coast of the Dead Sea. It is one of the original seven scrolls discovered in Qumran in 1947. In September 2011 the entire Great Isaiah Scroll was published online as part of the The Digital Dead Sea Scrolls project sponsored by the Israel Museum's Shrine of the Book and Google...

The Gezer Calendar (Circa 950 BCE): A tablet of soft limestone inscribed in a paleo-Hebrew script, the Gezer Calendar is one of the oldest known examples of Hebrew writing, dating to the 10th century BCE. It was discovered in excavations of the Biblical city of Gezer, 30 miles northwest of Jerusalem, by R.A.S. Macalister in his excavations between 1902 and 1907, and it is preserved in the Museum of the Ancient Orient in Istanbul. "The calendar describes monthly or bi-monthly...

One of the Earliest Surviving Examples of Narrative Relief Sculpture and Egyptian Hieroglyphs (Circa 3,200 BCE): The Narmer Palette, one of the earliest surviving examples of narrative relief sculpture, was found during excavations at Nekhen (Greek: Ἱεράκων πόλις 'city of hawks', Strabo xvii. p. 817, transliterated as Hierakonpolis, Hieraconpolis, or Hieracompolis; Arabic: الكوم الأحمر‎ Al-Kom Al-Aħmar) in the 1890s. It is also one of the earliest surviving records of Egyptian hieroglyphs.

In the age of the Vikings (800-1100AD) Scandinavia used a runic alphabet known as Younger Futhark (fuþark). It was made up of 16 sound symbols known as runes. Younger Futhark developed from Elder Futhark (150 to 800 AD), an older form of Germanic language consisting of 24 runes. Both alphabets are called after their first six runes F-U-þ-A-R-K. Younger Futhark is basically the written form of Old Norse – the language of the Vikings.

Sewing diary. Cunningham's handwritten notes accompany many samples and indicate variously where the fabric was purchased, who made it into clothing, who wore it, and where it was worn. The notes appear to have been written in retrospect, probably about 1885-90; the fabrics date from 1841 to 1890.

Sewing diary. Cunningham's handwritten notes accompany many samples and indicate variously where the fabric was purchased, who made it into clothing, who wore it, and where it was worn. The notes appear to have been written in retrospect, probably about 1885-90; the fabrics date from 1841 to 1890.

FDR's December 7, 1941 "Day of Infamy" speech, complete with edits and other handwritten notes

The Book of Kells (Circa 800) The decorated commencement of St. John's Gospel. The Book of Kells, sometimes known as the Book of Columba, contains a richly decorated copy of the Four Gospels in a Latin text based on the Vulgate edition (completed by St Jerome in 384 CE).

Handstitched Oyster Book Sculpture by Erica Ekrem

Envelope: DIY {Envelope}