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WWII: V-1 German V-1 'Doodle Bug' Flying Bomb

This album features images of the WWII German V-1 Doodle Bug Flying Bomb. The V1 flying bomb, or 'buzz' bomb, known originally as the Fieseler Fi 103, was the first of the Vergeltungswaffen "weapons of vengeance," named in response to Allied air assaults on Germany during World War II.

German soldiers transporting a V-1 flying bomb to the launch site, 1944 (b/w photo)

A German Fiesler Fi 103 flying-bomb (V1) in flight, as seen by the gun camera of an intercepting RAF fighter aircraft, moments before the fighter destroyed the V1 by cannon fire.

Fieseler V1 rocket

Dora-Mittelbau, Germany, Prisoners moving a completed V-2 missile

: This is a rare Kamikaze-style version of the V1 rocket which included a small cockpit so it could be flown accurately. It is pictured on display at the Lashenden Air Warfare Museum in Ashford, Kent

Reichenberg, a piloted V1, restored by the Lashenden Air Warfare Museum (Kent)

The Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon was a United States copy of the German V-1 flying bomb. Developed in 1944, and planned to be used in the United States invasion of Japan (Operation Downfall), the JB-2 was never used in combat.

The Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon was a United States copy of the German V-1 flying bomb. Developed in 1944, and planned to be used in the United States invasion of Japan (Operation Downfall), the JB-2 was never used in combat.

The Manned version of the Fi-103 Missile: Reichenberg IV as viewed from the side. These were the Reichenberg I single-seater with landing skid and flaps; the Reichenberg II with a V-1 Reichenburg-sidesecond cockpit in the position normally occupied by the warhead in the operational version, and the Reichenberg III single-seater with a similar arrangement of landing skid and flaps but with the Argus As 014 impulse duct fitted and ballast compensating for the weight of the warhead.

The Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon was a United States copy of the German V-1 flying bomb. Developed in 1944, and planned to be used in the United States invasion of Japan (Operation Downfall), the JB-2 was never used in combat. It was the most successful of the United States Army Air Forces Jet Bomb (JB) projects (JB-1 through JB-10) during World War II.

A: A simple bead sight supposedly aided target lineup, and dive angles marked on the side window provided the pilot last minute reading before he left his mount to its fate. B: The Reichenberg IV had only basic instrumentation and could supposedly be flown after minimal training. The cockpit had only four instruments. C: The nose of the Fi 103R-IV was packed with 1764Ib of explosives.

V-1 Missile | Aircraft |

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In flight after air launch of the JB-2 Loon, a U.S. made copy of the famous German V-1 surface-to-surface pilotless flying bomb, 1944.

The JB-2 Loon is a U.S. made copy of the famous German V-1 surface-to-surface pilotless flying bomb first used against England on June 12-13, 1944. The airframe for the JB-2 was built by the Republic Aviation Corporation and the engine by the Ford Motor Company from drawings prepared at Wright Field, using dimensions taken from the remains of several V-1s brought from Germany.

JB-2 Loon being inspected by USAAF personnel at Wendover AAF, 1944.

Ground preparation of the JB-2 Loon prior to air launch, 1944

Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg) Manned V 1 Flying bomb.

Specifications for the Fieseler Fi 103R: Length: 26 ft. 3 in. Span: 18ft. 9 in Weight: Loaded, 4,960 lb Power Plant: 1x Argus As 014 pulse jet rated at 660 lb. thrust at sea level. Performance Maximum speed: 497 mph. at 8,000 ft. Range:(from point of launching at 8,200 ft.), 205 miles. Powered endurance:32 min Armament One 1,874-lb. warhead

The Manned version of the Fi-103 Missile: Reichenberg IV as viewed from the rear. The operational model was the Reichenberg IV, and its conversion from the standard Fi 103 missile was the essence of simplicity.

The Manned version of the Fi-103 Missile: Reichenberg IV as viewed from the side. These were the Reichenberg I single-seater with landing skid and flaps; the Reichenberg II with a V-1 Reichenburg-sidesecond cockpit in the position normally occupied by the warhead in the operational version, and the Reichenberg III single-seater with a similar arrangement of landing skid and flaps but with the Argus As 014 impulse duct fitted and ballast compensating for the weight of the warhead.

The Manned version of the Fi-103 Missile: Reichenberg IV as viewed from the front. Four piloted models of the Fi 103 were evolved under the Reichenberg program, three of these being training variants.

Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg) Manned V 1 Flying bomb. In late May-June 1944, prototypes of variants of the manned weapon, known as "Reichenberg", were built, with designations "R-I" through "R-IV". Intended for use against shipping or heavily-defended ground targets, the piloted Fi 103 missile was developed under the code-name Reichenberg, and its progenitors were primarily Flugkapitdn Hanna Reitsch, the internationally-famous German woman pilot, and SS-Hauptsturmfdhrer Otto Skorzeny.

Fieseler Fi 103R (Reichenberg) Manned V 1 Flying bomb. Flugkapitan Reitsch and a certain Hauptmann Heinrich Lange had promoted a scheme for the recruiting of a cadre of pilots willing to sacrifice their lives if necessary by crashing their aircraft on to important targets. Although this scheme met with little favorable response from other than a few fanatics, it was pursued in modified form on a limited scale.

USAF Museum, Dayton, OH - WWII - German V Weapons / 09V1Flying Bomb.