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The Butterfly Nebula - NGC 6302 (also called the Bug Nebula, Butterfly Nebula, or Caldwell 69) is a bipolar planetary nebula in the constellation Scorpius. The structure in the nebula is among the most complex ever observed in planetary nebulae. The spectrum of NGC 6302 shows that its central star is one of the hottest stars in the galaxy, with a surface temperature in excess of 200,000 K, implying that the star from which it formed must have been very large.

The Crab Nebula (M1, NGC 1952) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellation of Taurus. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar, a neutron star 28–30 km across which emits pulses of radiation from gamma rays to radio waves with a spin rate of 30.2 times per second.

THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.

Shooting Star and Milky Way over Goblin Valley National Park in Green River, Utah. Photo Credit: Bret Webster The Milky Way is seen in the distance over a collection of hoodoos, tall spiny columns of rock which protrude from the bottom of arid basins.