Categories

Willie Vicarage, suffering facial wounds in the Battle of Jutland 1916 Naval Battle was one of the first men to receive facial reconstruction using plastic surgery. Doctor Harold Gillies created the "tubed pedicle" technique that used a flap of skin from the chest or forehead and swung it into place over the face. The flap remained attached but was stitched into a tube, keeping the original blood supply intact and dramatically reducing the infection rate.

20 Gnarly Old School War Wounds

medicalcodingschools.net

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

Wounded soldier from WWI

  • Linda Merz

    It is beyond the unthinkable what these men survived. I study interpersonal violence. As many articles have stated- the human face is the conduit of our very identity and humanity no matter how ordinary or beautiful. It's destruction has the power to negate our sense of self, personality identity, and connection with the interpersonal world of our making. The power of war to destroy these constructs is perhaps war's most insidious consequence.

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

Graphic Image - WWI Trench warfare exposed soldiers to a vast increase in head and facial injuries, leading to tremendous advancements in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction. However, not all surgeries were successful www.uterinefury.c...

  • Darillyn Starr

    I had a hard time choosing a photo to make this comment on! It is hard to look at these, even in black and white. I can't imagine the horror of these facial injuries. It is fascinating that so much was learned about reconstructive surgery during The Great War. I wonder how many of these horribly disfigured boys were really thankful for what was done for them. I mean, I am sure they appreciated the fact that there were people who were willing to work to try to give them a future. But I would bet that many took their own lives, at some point it time. On the other hand, I'm sure there were others who rose above it, had family and others who were able to get beyond what they looked like and maintained meaningful relationships. Probably some went on to raise families. I wish we knew their names and their histories, so we had something to remember them by besides these horrifying photos.

Wounded soldier from WWI with prosthetic face made from tin www.gilliesarchiv...

Loss of nose due to an injury, and replacement by a finger in 1880 we-make-money-not...

Victim of the trenches

Four views of facial reconstruction after a war wound, July 1916. www.superstock.co...


Spot something interesting?
You can save any Pin for later. All you have to do is sign up!
45 seconds
to sign up (free!)
25+ Billion
Pins to explore