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More like this: optical illusions, 3d drawings and lego room.

Photographer Léo Caillard makes images of classical statues dressed up as hipsters.

Original Project Description: This short time-lapse video is called EXISTENCE. The video is a statement not only about time and progression, but also a statement about the world we have created for ourselves. The basis of the video contrasts the two extremes of life itself: the urban metropolis, and the beauty outside the city. I love to stargaze. Watching the milky-way float across the sky is one of the most therapeutic experiences I have ever felt.

Tatsuo Horiuchi | the 73-year old Excel spreadsheet artist. “I never used Excel at work but I saw other people making pretty graphs and thought, ‘I could probably draw with that,’” says 73-year old Tatsuo Horiuchi. About 13 years ago, shortly before retiring, Horiuchi decide he needed a new challenge in his life. So he bought a computer and began experimenting with Excel...

Time travel by Flora Borsi: Time Traveling Woman Photoshops Self into Iconic Photos. Photographer Flóra Borsi photoshops herself into old black and white images of celebrities and people from past eras for her comical series titled Time Travel. The Budapest-based photographer is craftily featured in each manipulated image, hidden among throngs of fans, press, and commuters.

Le Petit Prince, Photo Series Imagines an Ordinary Life for a Boy with Muscular Dystrophy. In the heartwarming photo series “Le Petit Prince,” 12-year-old Lukas is depicted leading the active life of an ordinary boy: playing basketball, skateboarding, and so on—all activities he cannot perform in real life due to muscular dystrophy. The series was created by Matej Peljhan, a Slovenian photographer and psychologist who specializes in photographic therapy.

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling: 1. You admire a character for trying more than for their successes. 2. You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be very different. 3. Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite. 4. Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___....

3D Drawings That Jump Off The Page: Artist Ramon Bruin is taking hyperrealistic drawings to a whole new dimension – the third dimension, to be more precise! Ramon who is a Dutch illustrator, creates realistic 3D renderings of snakes, birds, and all sort of creepy creatures using nothing but a pencil, paper and his own imagination. Those impressive cartoons you see seem to jump off the paper right at you! The technique in use is #Anamorphosis.

During a time when computing power was so scarce that it required a government-defense budget to finance it, a young man used a $238 million military computer, the largest such machine ever built, to render an image of a curvy woman on a glowing cathode ray tube screen. The year was 1956, and the creation was a landmark moment in computer graphics and cultural history that has gone unnoticed until now. Using equipment designed to guard against the apocalypse, a pin-up girl had been drawn...

Russian photographer Vadim Mahorov goes to death-defying heights for the perfect shot. While the thrill of scaling buildings, towers and monuments is part of the allure, the dramatic aerial landscapes Vadim captures are absolutely breathtaking. Although many are quick to lump Vadim with other youths simply looking for the rush of infiltrating places they shouldn’t be, Vadim shows a clear passion for photography.

Tim Flach: More than Human. This series of animal photographs by Tim Flach brings the viewer into an unnatural proximity to his subjects, encouraging discussion on the human-animal boundary and attitudes towards non-human animals and the changing relationships, both literally and allegorically, between man and animal...

In 1963, American photographer Melvin Sokolsky shot a gorgeous series for Harper’s BAZAAR of a model inside a giant plexi-glass bubble all around Paris...

Wavy Field Just Won’t Stop Moving. Not only does this static picture seem to move as your eyes move across it, it also gives an impression the lines of rounded rectangles it is composed of are slanted. If you look closer, you’ll soon realise all of the rounded rects are lined up perfectly, both horizontally and vertically...

Before Green Eggs: See The Advertising Work Of Dr. Seuss. Long before Sam went to extraordinary lengths to peddle discolored breakfast foods to obstinate citizens, Dr. Seuss made his living as an advertising illustrator--and in retrospect, his work is unmistakable. Seuss became the father of the modern day children’s stories not solely through his inventive lexicon molded into clever syntax and anapestic meter, but also through vivid imaginary worlds and the charming characters within them...

"Welcome to Pyongyang". How do you photograph one of the most secretive countries in the world? For Charlie Crane the answer was simple, photograph what they want you to see. If there is no possibility of getting underneath the surface then the answer was to photograph the surface itself. This series is taken from a larger body of work in Pyongyang, the capital city of North Korea.

"Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started with Photographing Female Subjects" I found this post interesting because a) it would come in handy, but also b) the poses are SO recognizable they are cliché. (of course there are only so many ways to photograph a person, so that enters into it too)

Photos of people being hit by huge gusts of air. "Blow Job" by Tadao Cern, via Behance

The inaugural Tokyo Hotaru festival was held last weekend. And kicking off the festivities were an impressive display of 100,000 LED lights – made to resemble hotaru (fireflies) – that floated down the Sumida River through central Tokyo. Dubbed “prayer stars,” the LEDs were provided by Panasonic, who claims that the balls, which were designed to light up upon contact with water, were 100% powered by solar energy.

The Descriptive Camera works a lot like a regular camera—point it at subject and press the shutter button. However, instead of producing an image, this prototype outputs a text description of the scene. Modern digital cameras capture gobs of parsable metadata about photos such as the camera's settings, the location of the photo, the date, and time, but they don't output any information about the content of the photo. The Descriptive Camera only outputs the metadata about the content...

One of the tried and true techniques to making normal photographs stand out is to use a tilt shift lens and “miniaturize” your subject matter. Brazilian photographer Valentino Fialdini decided to put a unique spin on this lens trick and make the miniature world look lifesize. Using his tilt shift lens, Valentino was able to increase the depth of field in these tiny Lego rooms to make them look like normal building interiors...

Sometimes an artist creates something so beautifully simple that it takes your breath away…. literally. Artist Jason de Caires Taylor creates life-size cement sculptures of people and submerges them into the waters of South America. As time passes the sculptures become part of the underwater landscape and slowly become artificial reefs ripe with marine life. The process of experiencing artwork out of a traditional gallery and underwater is described with intimately vivid detail on his site...

Cool demonstration of how your eyes aren't steady... (even though you think they are) "For some reason the image won't stop moving... When I tell you its not even an animated GIF, how would you explain this? I’ve read somewhere on the web that it has something to do with your eyes’ microsaccades, the small, jerk-like, involuntary eye movements we all experience but usually don’t notice."

Egyptian & Mayan-Aztec Calendars: Incredibly Sophisticated Earliest Works of Art. Regardless of what you think about Mayan Calendar concerning 2012, you have to admit their representation of time flow was simply stunning...

In 1930, Iowa artist Grant Wood painted American Gothic. The models he used for the painting were his sister Nan Wood Graham and his dentist, Byron McKeeby. Here they are next to the painting...