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Joyce Banda: Malawi's first female president

Joyce Banda, who has made history becoming Malawi's first female president and only the second woman to lead a country in Africa, has a track record of fighting for women's rights, writes the BBC's Raphael Tenthani.
Lisa Jemus
Lisa Jemus • 1 year ago

Joyce Banda - Malawi's First Female President

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Meet the extraordinary Joyce Hilda Ntila Banda. The first female president of Malawi and the whole of South Africa. She endured 10 years living with an abusive husband. Unlike most Malawian women, Joyce braved to raise her three children by herself. Eventually, she became a successful businesswoman. "When we empower women with education and access to reproductive health services, we can lift an entire nation". Joyce Banda www.thextraordina...

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