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Ghostly shape of 'coldest place in the universe' revealed

Astronomers have taken a new look at the Boomerang Nebula, the so-called "coldest place in the Universe" to learn more about its frigid properties and determine its true shape, which has an eerily ghost-like appearance.
Melanie Kim
Melanie Kim • 39 weeks ago

At a cosmologically crisp one degree Kelvin (minus 458 degrees Fahrenheit), the Boomerang Nebula is the coldest known object in the Universe -- colder, in fact, than the faint afterglow of the Big Bang, which is the natural background temperature of space. . (Credit: Bill Saxton; NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA/Hubble; Raghvendra Sahai)

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