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POZ Magazine
POZ Magazine • 2 years ago

Nathaniel Pier was a private physician who treated people living with AIDS in New York City during the epidemic’s initial outbreak in the early 1980s. He died from the virus in 1989 when he was 37 years old. Instead of succumbing to depression after her loss, his mother, Mollie Pier, decided to honor the memory of her son by cofounding Project Chicken Soup (PCS), a nonprofit organization in California.

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Nathaniel Pier was a private physician who treated people living with AIDS in New York City during the epidemic’s initial outbreak in the early 1980s. He died from the virus in 1989 when he was 37 years old. Instead of succumbing to depression after her loss, his mother, Mollie Pier, decided to honor the memory of her son by cofounding Project Chicken Soup (PCS), a nonprofit organization in California.

During the late 1980s, a group of New York mothers, fathers and friends—mobilized by the shock and grief of a loved one’s HIV infection and the inadequacy of existing treatment options—became AIDS advocates. They established Concerned Parents for AIDS Research, an all-volunteer group that continues to raise millions of dollars to advance HIV research today.

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The film "Vito" is about - In the aftermath of Stonewall, a newly politicized Vito Russo found his voice as a gay activist and critic of LGBT representation in the media. He went on to write "The Celluloid Closet," the first book to critique Hollywood's portrayals of gays on screen. During the AIDS crisis in the 1980s, Vito became a passionate advocate for justice via the newly formed ACT UP, before his death in 1990.

AIDS appears in the late 70s, became a major problem across the globe by the 1980s.

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These photos were taken by my brother during the AIDS riots in the late 1980′s in California.