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Facts: Hitler's GI Death Camp

Deep inside the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, newly discovered artifacts, photographs, and journals tell the story of 350 American GIs who were held as prisoners of war in one of Hitler's most secretive slave labor camps, known as Berga. Here are some of the facts of the story. In
Gloria Thompson
Gloria Thompson • 1 year ago

Newly discovered artifacts, photographs, and journals tell the story of 350 American GIs who were held as prisoners of war in one of Hitler's most secretive slave labor camps, known as Berga. Most of the American GIs weighed around 160 to 170 pounds when they arrived at Berga. When they were released ten weeks later, most of the survivors weighed around 80 to 90 pounds.

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