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Nayarit, Mexico, 300 BC-AD 200, The Walters Art Museum

*This is a classic Mayan chocolate pot used in feasts sponsored by the ruling elite. This is at the Walters Art Museum in the special exhibition "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas: The John Bourne Collection Gift." art.thewalters.or...

Figurative Bottle, Salinar, 200 BC- 100 AD, ceramic orangeware

Attributed to Praxiteles (Greek, Athens, c. 400/390-330/325 BC), Apollo Sauroktonos ("Lizard-Slayer"), probably 350-275 BC, possibly 275 BC-AD 300, bronze, copper and stone inlay, Cleveland Museum of Art

Effigy Bottle - Northern Peru's pottery traditions focus on three-dimensionality, the vessels often modeled into a variety of forms depicting human figures, fruits or vegetables and even architecture. The Walters Art Museum in the special exhibition "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas: The John Bourne Collection Gift." art.thewalters.or...

Figural urns found in chambers inside deep shaft tombs are abundant in northwestern Colombia. This is at the Walters Art Museum in the special exhibition "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas: The John Bourne Collection Gift."

Female Ritual Performer - South-central Veracruz was home to a number of vibrant sculptural traditions. The Walters Art Museum in the special exhibition "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas: The John Bourne Collection Gift."

Anonymous (Minoan). 'Snake Goddess,' 1600 BC. black steatite. Walters Art Museum (23.196): Acquired by Henry Walters, 1929.

MEXICO | Seated Ballplayer, 1st century BCE–3rd century CE. Mexico. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Mother and Child - A mother proudly supports her male child who, with her help, stands securely on her lap. The Walters Art Museum in the special exhibition "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas: The John Bourne Collection Gift." art.thewalters.or...

Pedestal Dish - Binary opposition is a central precept of ancient Panamanian cosmology, which viewed the cosmos as the pairing of opposites: male-female, light-dark, spirit world-natural world. This is at the Walters Art Museum in the special exhibition "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas: The John Bourne Collection Gift." art.thewalters.org

Standing Female Figure with Crossed Arms Neolithic, Greece, 6000 - 4000 B.C.