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Natural Homes
Natural Homes • 2 years ago

This English house was built by a farmer in 1350 using only natural materials that have now survived for almost seven centuries. In 1395 it was bought by the church and over 200 years later, around 1600, the house got its first glazed windows. It is now owned by the British National Trust who bought it for £10 in 1896. Read and see more pictures at www.naturalhomes....

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The Celts built their roundhouses from the natural materials available on the land. The roundhouses at Felin Uchaf are built in the same way using only the natural materials available on or near the land. Find out how to build one on www.naturalhomes.org

The Celts built their roundhouses from the natural materials available on the land. The roundhouses at Felin Uchaf are built in the same way using only the natural materials available on or near the land. Find out how to build one on www.naturalhomes.org

If you ever doubted the use of natural materials to build a home these nine buildings are a testament to its longevity. We'll take you back to the oldest, continuously lived in wooden home in Europe in leaps of 100 years to the 12th century. More about these homes here www.naturalhomes....

This is a rubble stone lime mortar thatched cottage built in 1811 in Blaise Hamlet near Bristol, England. The cottage, along with the rest of the hamlet, is owned by the UK's National Trust.

A collection of thatching around the world with more details here www.naturalhomes..... Thatch can have an extremely long lifespan on a building. A thatcher will leave the base coat of thatch on the house adding new fresh straw or reed. This practice goes back centuries, so much so that in Britain there are approximately 250 examples of original base coats that survive from the late medieval period (1350-1600).

This is the beautiful work of Bjarne Wickstrøm [www.oeko-byg.dk] in Gislev, Denmark. Bjarne specialises in Rørvæv (an interwoven reed lath), clay plastering, cob and straw bale building, thatching and masonry stoves. All those skills have gone into making this beautiful tiny house (10 m2) for his son. It's built entirely from local materials even down to the exterior plaster of clay with horse droppings and a final coat of lime. Inside you will find a heated sleeping bench and a very happy boy.

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