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Jeane Looij
Jeane Looij • 1 year ago

In 1906, British Parliament member Sir Gilbert Parker was attending a debate when he spotted Sir Frederick Carne Rasch, a fellow Parliament member, sitting nearby. This greatly surprised Sir Gilbert, as Sir Frederick was severely ill with influenza at the time. Still, he politely greeted Sir Frederick and told him,

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The concept of ley lines was first introduced by Alfred Watkins in his books Early British Trackways and The Old Straight Track. He noted that many ancient monuments, churches and landmarks were aligned with one other on straight lines. Watkins speculated these li