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National Rifle Association

SUNDIAL CANNON: This curious time piece is an excellent example of the now scarce sundial guns. The variant pictured is of marble, brass and glass construction dating from approximately 1850. The cannon is a brass miniature fixture with a .30 caliber bore.

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The Sundial Cannon-This sundial gun is of marble, brass & glass construction dating from approximately 1850. The cannon is a brass mini fixture with a .30 ca bore. As the sun moves across the sky, the beam is narrowed through the suspended glass lens gnomon & travels along the stone etched arc, ticking off the hours at each pass. At Noon, the sun’s rays land on the cannon’s breech, sparking a powder charge previously placed in the trough-shaped touchhole.

Ann Patrick Double Rifle - Our GOTD is a percussion double rifle built by Ann Patrick of Liverpool. With big .70 caliber bores, this double rifle was likely manufactured when Ann Patrick had her shop from 1820-1830 at 44 Strand Street and was the daughter of Jeremiah Patrick, a noted flintlock gunmaker of Liverpool. The unique engraving on this piece also gives you the chance to see something looking back to you when you examine the patchbox. At the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, VA.

British Saw Handle Percussion Pistol - Solid metal framed pistols were preferred by some shooters of heavy caliber handguns. Traditional wood-stocked handguns which retained their barrels by wedges would over time and recoil split at the forend retainers. The Saw handle refers to the odd-shaped grip stemming from the back strap of the pistol. The GOTD can be found in the galleries of the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Virginia.

Colt M1862 Police revolver - 150 years ago, the Colt factory had a bad day. It burned down. Believed started by Confederate agents, the Colt fire in 1864 put a real crimp in the company’s percussion revolver production for the remainder of the year. But one gun that didn’t burn up in Hartford, CT was this engraved Colt .36 caliber revolver. This five-shot handgun probably sold for an elevated price in the high demand market of 1864. At the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, VA.

Joalland Needle-fire pistol - This all-metal Louis Joalland pistol was made in Bourges, France and like the Dreyse rifle, this handgun is a single shot design, opening by twisting to the right and pulling back to insert a cartridge into the chamber. The engraving on this pistol includes stylized griffins amidst the raised scroll embellishments. The blackpowder propellant of that period was fairly corrosive. This .40 caliber handgun, on display in the National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, VA.

Alexander Henry Howdah Pistol - Hunters in India after dangerous game employed an elevated platform, or howdah, mounted on the back of an elephant. As final defense if a tiger were to claw its way to the hunter up the back of the elephant, the howda pistol, a heavy caliber single or double-barreled pistol was available. This gold-embellished .577 Snyder cal. example is one of the finest known. At the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, VA

COLARD DOUBLE-ACTION PINFIRE REVOLVER: Belgian Charles T. Colard crafted a fine double-action pinfire piece in this revolver, which carries out an incredible baroque theme of embellishment. Few other firearms have a barrel that begins as hexagonal, changes to round profile, and then goes to hexagonal configuration again, only to shift to a series of ringed sections at the muzzle. Unusual multi-colored gold inlays are scattered over the blued and case-colored surfaces of this revolver as well.