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Felicia Mathis
Felicia Mathis • 1 year ago

The 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion was the only all African-American, all-female battalion during World War II. Called the Six Triple Eight, the women moved mountains of mail that clogged warehouses in Birmingham for American service members and civilians in the mid-1940s.

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Eugene Jacques Bullard First African American Combat Pilot

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pinner writes: Eugene Jacques Bullard (9 October 1894 – 12 October 1961) was one of the only two black military pilots in World War I and awarded the Croix de Guerre and the Legion of Honor. via @Debbie Manuel

Eugene Jacques Bullard Born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1894, stowed away to Europe as a teenager, earning money as a prizefighter and interpreter. When World War I erupted he joined the French army and ultimately became the world’s first black fighter pilot. He later married the daughter of a French countess, opened a nightclub in Paris and hobnobbed with the likes of Josephine Baker, Louis Armstrong and Ernest Hemingway.