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Felicia Mathis
Felicia Mathis • 1 year ago

Miss Mary-Mary Frances Hill Coley-Black Midwife, delivered more than 3,000 in the south. Featured in 1953 educational film by George Stoney to teach midwifery skills to others. It is still being used in third world counties because of its simplicity.

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