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Tender Photos Unearthed from a Turbulent Time

by Yahoo! blogger Sarah B. Weir
When Mildred and Richard Loving married in Washington, D.C. in 1958, they didn't think they were breaking the law. Both were from the small town of Central Point, Virginia. Mildred was of African-American and Native American decent and Richard was white. They did know it was illegal for them to marr...
Cee Em-Jordan
Cee Em-Jordan • 1 year ago

1950s - America's laws against Interracial Marriage: When Mildred and Richard Loving married in Washington, D.C. in 1958, they didn't think they were breaking the law. Both were from the small town of Central Point, Virginia. Mildred was of African-American and Native American decent and Richard was white. They did know it was illegal for them to marry in their state-as well as 15 others--which is why they left to tie the knot. Within a month of returning home, police burst into their bedroo...

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Mildred Loving greeting her husband Richard on their front porch, King and Queen County Virginia. April 1965

Women of Fauberg Treme, New Orleans and their dog. Faubourg Tremé is the oldest black neighborhood in America, and the origin of the southern civil rights movement and the birthplace of jazz.

Paul Robeson was a famous African-American athlete, singer, actor, and advocate for the civil rights of people around the world. He rose to prominence in a time when segregation was legal in the United States, and Black people were being lynched by racist mobs, especially in the South.

Claudette Colvin. Nine months before Rosa Parks’ famous bus boycott, Colvin at 15 refused to give up her seat to a white passenger. She was inspired to stand up for her rights after learning about African American leaders in school. Civil rights leaders didn't publicize her story because she became an unwed mother.

Unlikely couple. Early 20th century. -------- I really would like to know who this couple was, and the story around them. Given the era, if they were married, it was unlikely that he took her home to the west. Mixed raced marriages were anything but well received.

“It isn’t enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn’t enough to believe in it. One must work at it.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

Breaking the law with style