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Serenity Leith
Serenity Leith • 2 years ago

Zitkala-Sa "Red Bird" a Lakota woman who was a member of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show in NYC. Zitkala-Sa was becoming well-known as a performer, writer, musician, and more recently, as an advocate on behalf of Native Americans. She was included in Harper's Bazaar's 1900 list of "Persons Who Interest Us."

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"Zitkala-Ša (1876–1938), was a Sioux writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist. Zitkala-Ša was raised on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota by her mother, Ellen Simmons, whose Dakota name was Taté Iyòhiwin (Every Wind or Reaches for the Wind). Her father was a European-American man named Felker, who abandoned the family while Zitkala-Ša was still very young."

More photos by Gertrude Käsebier of Zitkala-Sa, who used her Lakota name as an artist and writer and when appearing in public; she used her English name, Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, in legal matters and in letters to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Käsebier's portraits present these multiple identities, capturing Zitkala-Sa in Lakota dress as well as Americanized dress, and sometimes with representations of both identities simultaneously present.

Portrait of Zitkala-Sa by Gertrude Kasebier, about 1898. Zitkala-Sa was the pen name of writer and activist Gertrude Simmons Bonnin (1876-1938).  She exposed the hardships faced by students at Native American boarding schools by writing about her own experiences as a student and as a teacher.  Zitkala-Sa also published a book of tribal folklore called Old Indian Legends. She also founded the National Council of American Indians, which was trans-tribal, to lobby for better treatment for all.

Photo by Gertrude Käsebier // Zitkala-Sa (1876-1938) was a Yankton Sioux woman of Native American & white mixed ancestry. She was well educated and went on to become an author, musician, composer and later went on to work for the reform of Indian policies in the United States.

Zitkala-Sa by Gertrude Käsebier, 1898. Zitkala-Sa was a Yankton Sioux woman. She was well educated and went on to become an accomplished author, musician and composer - she wrote the first American Indian opera, The Sun Opera, in 1913. She went on to work for the reform of Indian policies in the United States

Zitkala-Sa photographed by Gertrude Käsebier, c.1900. Gertrude Simmons Bonnin (1876-1938), better known as Zitkala-Sa (“Red Bird”), was a Dakota writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist. Co-composed the first American Indian opera, The Sun Dance (composed in romantic style based on Ute and Sioux themes), 1913. Gertrude Käsebier (American, 1852–1934) was known for her images of motherhood, her portraits of Native Americans and her promotion of photography as a career for women.

Zitkala-Sa was a Yankton Sioux woman. She was well educated and went on to become an accomplished author, musician and composer - she wrote the first American Indian opera, The Sun Opera, in 1913. She went on to work for the reform of Indian policies in the United States

Zitkala-Sa was a beautiful Yankton Sioux woman of Native American & white mixed ancestry. She was well educated and went on to become an accomplished author, musician, composer and later went on to work for the reform of Indian policies in the United States.

Zitkala-Sa was a Yankton Sioux woman. She was well educated and went on to become an accomplished author, musician and composer - she wrote the first American Indian opera, The Sun Opera, in 1913. She went on to work for the reform of Indian policies in the United States

Red Bird, Zitkala-Sa, Lakota, 1898. " I prefer to their dogma my excursions into the natural gardens where the voice of the Great Spirit is heard in the twittering of birds, the rippling of mighty waters, and the sweet breathing of flowers. If this is Paganism, then at present, at least, I am a Pagan."