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Grim Rowntree
Grim Rowntree • 1 year ago

✯ Aunt Caroline Dye was a famous hoodoo woman or two-headed doctor who lived in Newport, Arkansas. A spiritualist as well as a root worker, for the crudely sketched aura around her head and the winged, dog-headed figure with its hand or paw on her right shoulder-like her name were drawn on the film negative - indicate that she maintained contact with other-worldly spirits. The standing figure may represent a "spirit guide" or the Devil's black dog one meets at the crossroads.✯

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Aunt Caroline Dye was a famous hoodoo woman or two-headed doctor who lived in Newport, Arkansas. According to one blues historian (Stephen C. La Vere), she was born in 1810 and died in 1918 at the age of 108; according to another (Paul Oliver) she died in 1944. Neither story completely fits the evidence, however. In any case, from this photo one can infer something else—Aunt Caroline Dye was a spiritualist as well as a root worker, for the crudely sketched aura around her head

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