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Daniel E
Daniel E • 3 years ago

Bibi Aisha, shown here in 2010, lived in a women's shelter in Kabul for several months after her husband cut off her nose and ears. Women who flee domestic violence in Afghanistan are often imprisoned.

  • Candice Hopkins
    Candice Hopkins • 2 years ago

    Yet they claim to be a religion of peace. :(

  • Daniel E
    Daniel E • 1 year ago

    Neither this picture nor this pin is a criticism of Islam. Human history is splattered with unspeakable cruelties done in the name of nearly all religions. This picture consequently is simply a snapshot of human savagery.

  • Cindy Noble
    Cindy Noble • 1 year ago

    I'm going tell it as it is lslam is evil there is nothing OK about. Learn the truth before you tip toe around it . wake up people ; /

  • Daniel E
    Daniel E • 1 year ago

    Oh, I see now. Islam is evil. Aisha's husband did this because he was an evil Islamic Taliban. Aisha got this done to her and DESERVED it because she is either a.) Muslim herself and therefore evil, or b.) married to an evil man and by extension evil herself. No more tip-toeing here. The truth has set me free.

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Bibi Aisha, an 18-year-old woman from Oruzgan province in Afghanistan, fled back to her family home from her husband's house, complaining of violent treatment. The Taliban arrived one night, demanding Bibi be handed over to face justice. After a Taliban commander pronounced his verdict, Bibi's brother-in-law held her down and her husband sliced off her ears and then cut off her nose. Bibi was abandoned, but later rescued by aid workers and the U.S. military. (Jodi Bieber)

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Bibi Aisha, an 18-year-old woman from Oruzgan province in Afghanistan, fled back to her family home from her husband's house, complaining of violent treatment. The Taliban arrived one night, demanding Bibi be handed over to face justice. After a Taliban commander pronounced his verdict, Bibi's brother-in-law held her down and her husband sliced off her ears and then cut off her nose. Bibi was abandoned, but later rescued by aid workers and the U.S. military. After time in a women's refuge in ...

This poster was done for a domestic violence center in New Britain, Connecticut, USA. Prudence Crandall is a non-profit shelter for battered women, men, and children. They have been using this poster in their facility - www.prudencecrand... - 24 Hour Hotline TOLL FREE IN CONNECTICUT (888) 774-2900 - Domestic Violence 24 Hour Hotline (860) 225-6357 - Feminicide, Woman Rights, Women Rights, Stop Violence Against Women, Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence Awareness Month is October. Don't hide the violence anymore.

“Pray that we never see this day. Today, more than 68% of women in India are victims of domestic violence. Tomorrow, it seems like no woman shall be spared. Not even the ones we pray to.” | India's Incredibly Powerful "Abused Goddesses" Campaign Condemns Domestic Violence

It is a portrait of Aisha, an 18-year-old Afghani girl, taken by Jodi Bieber. Aisha was sentenced by a Taliban commander to have her nose and ears cut off for fleeing her abusive in-laws.

The World Press Photo of the Year- Bibi Aisha, 18, was disfigured as retribution for fleeing her husband’s house in Oruzgan province, in the center of Afghanistan. At the age of 12, Aisha and her younger sister had been given to the family of a Taliban fighter under a Pashtun tribal custom for settling disputes. We don't realiaze how blessed we and our families are.