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Civil War CDV, 11th Indiana Volunteer Infantry by hoosiermarine, via Flickr

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service.

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service. Despite her age, she never missed a day of work in the ten years she carried the mail and earned the nickname “Stagecoach” for her reliability. Fields loved the job, despite the many dangers and diff

Brigadier General James Thadeus Holtzclaw, CSA (1833-1893)

Colonel James Brown Forman, 15th Kentucky Vol. Inf. Reg. He entered service as a private, was lieutenant of the company he recruited, promoted to Capt. of the Co. after the capt. was killed in action,and promoted to Colonel of the regiment after the Battle of Perryville, Ky. when Col. Pope was wounded. gen. Rosecrans referred to him as his "Boy colonel" because he was only 19 years old.

Brigadier General Benjamin Franklin Cheatham, CSA (1820-1886)

Brigadier General Marcellus Augustus Stovall, CSA (1818 – 1895)

... 1861 Indiana Civil War Recruiting Poster, - Cowan's Auctions

Brigadier General John C. Carter, CSA (1837-1864)

Portrait of Captain Edward Camden: Volusia County, Florida, April 1917. "He put on his Civil War veteran's uniform and tried to register for the draft on the first day of World War I."

Letter to Joseph Hooker from Lincoln, January 26, 1863.

“All quiet along the Potomac” Mathew Brady’s cameraman, Thomas Le Mere, thought that a standing pose of the president would be popular. Lincoln wondered if it could be accomplished in one shot, and this is the successful result. It was taken on April 17, 1863