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Click here for more photos from National Geographic Your Shot. Photograph of the holy Quran taken at dusk inside the Nakhoda Masjid, Calcutta. (Photo Courtesy Indrajit Bhattacharya/National Geographic Your Shot)

Autumn Landscape. Photograph by Olegas Kurasovas

Grand-Prize Winner and Nature Winner Photo and caption by Shikhei Goh Arrows of rain seem to pelt a dragonfly in Indonesia's Riau Islands in "Splashing,” the winning image of the 2011 National Geographic Photography Contest. To capture the photo, photographer Shikhei Goh took advantage of “superb lighting” and a friend spraying water on the dragonfly to simulate rain.

Nature Winner. "The blue pond" of the famous tourist resort. This is a place where many tourists gather in spring, summer, and autumn. However, since this pond freezes in winter, nobody is during that period. This photograph is the moment first snow of the season is falling in that blue pond. We can see first snow of the season from the end of October. Why is blue? This is because the underground hot spring ingredient is gushing. This blue pond changes a color every day. I think that mystical blue and pure white snow are beautiful. All are nature's tints. Photo and caption by Kent Shiraishi Photo location ; Biei, Hokkaido, Japan

An onlooker of the annular solar eclipse witnesses the celestial event on May 20, 2012. (Photo and caption courtesy Colleen Pinski/National Geographic Your Shot)

Click here for more photos from National Geographic Your Shot. The beauty of nature is around us, just look around. (Photo and caption courtesy Aleksandr Ostrovskiy/National Geographic Your Shot)

Click here for more photos from National Geographic Your Shot. Image of a black-necked stilt chick (Himantopus mexicanus) foraging in Arizona. The field had small mounds of orange-colored dirt, which provided a distinctive background for the photograph. (Photo Courtesy Phil Seu/National Geographic Your Shot)