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Jett- Jett
Jett- Jett • 2 years ago

The Hindenburg disaster took place on Thursday, May 6, 1937, as the German passenger airship caught fire and was destroyed during its attempt to dock with its mooring mast at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. Of the 97 people on board, there were 36 fatalities including one death among the ground crew.

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May 6, 1937, the hydrogen-filled German dirigible "Hindenburg" bursts into flames and crashes while docking in Lakehurst, New Jersey, killing 36 out of the 97 on board.

The Hindenburg hits the ground in flames in Lakehurst, N.J. on May 6, 1937.

Hindenburg disaster, Thursday, May 6, 1937, Lakehurst, New Jersey

The Hindenburg disaster took place on Thursday, May 6, 1937, as the German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg caught fire & was destroyed during its attempt to dock with its mooring mast at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station, which is located adjacent to the borough of Lakehurst, New Jersey. Of the 97 people on board (36 passengers, 61 crew), there were 35 fatalities, including one death among the ground crew. Amazing photo!

The Hindeburg explodes on 6 May, 1937 at Lakehurst, New Jersey, USA.

The Hindenburg disaster, by Sam Shere, 1937

Crash of the Hindenburg zeppelin in 1937. It came from Frankfurt, Germany and crashed in Lakehurst, N.J.

Topless men were banned from the beaches of Atlantic City in New Jersey because the city didn’t want “gorillas on our beaches.” It wasn’t until 1937 when men finally won the right to wear just swimming shorts without a shirt. #menswear #swimsuit

The Hindenburg over Manhattan on May 6, 1937, just hours before exploding at a New Jersey airfield

The Great Blizzard of 1888 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States. Snowfalls of 40-50 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet. Railroads were shut down and people were confined to their houses for up to a week.