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Kelly Elizabeth
Kelly Elizabeth • 2 years ago

National Geographic and a team of researchers have unveiled new images of the Titanic, revealing unrestricted views of the wreck for the first time ever for the 100th anniversary. The detailed, sweeping images of the sunken ship were made by stitching together hundreds of optical and sonar images collected by three deep-diving robots during a 2010 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution expedition. hensleyphoto

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National Geographic and a team of researchers have unveiled new images of the Titanic, revealing unrestricted views of the wreck for the first time ever for the 100th anniversary. The detailed, sweeping images of the sunken ship were made by stitching together hundreds of optical and sonar images collected by three deep-diving robots during a 2010 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution expedition.

The Crash Scene. Visible for the first time through sonar imaging, the remains of the ship and its contents sprawl across a thousand acres of gently sloping seafloor. Combined with optical mosaics of individual artifacts (colored images), this map of the main wreck area will help experts explore, manage and protect the Titanic as a long-term archaeological site. Click on the points of interest below to explore the debris field.

Under construction: Mr Logvynenko's coloured images show the Titanic from when it was being built (right) to the finished deck

A sonar image of the Titanic on the seabed. It split into two sections during the sinking

Titanic - love the ceiling detail!

In this Aug. 28, 2010 image released by Premier Exhibitions, Inc.-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the starboard side of the Titanic bow is shown. Read more: www.foxnews.com/...

The news of the time said the ship broke in two, but this was years later denied by researchers - who were not present at the time of the sinking

Titanic’s rudder, there’s a man in the photo to show the scale of it. It took me so long to spot him!