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Elbert & Louisa Jemison, Wedding Picture, Talladega, Alabama 1860 census for Anderson County, Texas, has them at Tennessee Colony. He was 25 and she was 18 in 1860. No kids yet. He’ll go into the 1st Texas Infantry, shot through the lungs at Gaines Mill, shot through the hip and thigh at Sharpsburg, wounded slightly in left breast at Cold Harbor. Resigned August 19, 1864, and that’s when we think they (she moved back to Talladega for the war) moved back to their property in Texas and he...

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service.

The Square and Davy Crockett Statue Lawrenceburg, Tennessee

Kentucky & Tennessee Stories: Attention to the Feud: Hatfields & McCoys

Justice is served! James Earl Ray on the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King: convicted on March 10, 1969, after entering a guilty plea to forgo a jury trial. Had he been found guilty by jury trial, he would have been eligible for the death penalty.[1] He was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He later recanted his confession and tried unsuccessfully to gain a new trial. He died in prison

Prison Garb 1924. Belva Annan murderess whose trial records became the musical "Chicago."

On April 24, 1959 Mack Charles Parker was taken from his jail cell in Poplarville MS, beaten and shot, and his body was thrown into the Pearl River. Parker was due to stand trial in three days for the alleged rape of a white woman. There were confessions to his murder but no charges were ever filed. In his book "Blood Justice: The Lynching of Mack Charles Parker" Howard Smead called it the last classic lynching in the United States. #TodayInBlackHistory

Liberated slaves were treated as contraband or captured property at this time. The confiscation act of 1861 allowed seizing Confederate property but did not clarify the fate of captured slaves. One Union general gained notoriety for general order No. 11 which freed all slaves in areas under his control. President Lincoln countermanded this order amid concerns of the political consequences in four slave holding border states that remained in the Union.

Frederick Fritz Pollard Frederick Douglass "Fritz" Pollard (January 27, 1894 – May 11, 1986) was the first African American head coach in the National Football League (NFL). Pollard along with Bobby Marshall were the first two African American players in the NFL in 1920.

Australia’s first women Olympians, Fanny Durack and Mina Wylie, 1912 by State Library of New South Wales collection, via Flickr

Barney Ford was born a slave in Virginia. At the age of twenty-fire, he escaped and began a successful career in a variety of entrepreneurial ventures.By 1860, he was living in Denver and became a prosperous tycoon in the hotel, restaurant, and barbershop businesses, earning the nickname the "Black Baron of Colorado." Throughout the Civil War, he gave financial assistance, food, and jobs to escaped and free African Americans.

Freedom Riders in Jackson, Mississippi (1961)