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Pat Rerucha
Pat Rerucha • 1 year ago

Recruiting poster of the White Knights of the Mississippi Ku Klux Klan 8-15-65. I want this photo and will take artistic license and use it. Also appears in the book LOCAL PEOPLE credited to Mitchell Library, Mississippi State University.

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Mississippi: Subversion of the Right to Vote; 1964 :: Historical Manuscripts and Photographs. Identifier: mus.am11.77.0023 From the McAtee (William "Bill" G.) Civil Rights Collection; This collection contains an original curriculum packet given out at the SNCC-NCC training site in Oxford, Ohio, for Freedom Summer workers going to Mississippi. It is accompanied by William G. McAtee's notes on how he was presented with the packet on June 25, 1964. A pamphlet.

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TAKE STOCK. Black citizen checks ballot form before voting, Canton, Mississippi, 1965.

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2470307 canvassing and voter registration for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.

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The Mississippi Freedom Riders arrested in Jackson, Miss in 1961. These are the faces of the Civil Rights Movement that are rarely spoken of. It wasn't just black folks who marched, but Jewish and white american who also spoke out and fought for civil rights. Some went to jail and some died. Lest we all forget the price that was paid for all of us.