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Heather Smeding
Heather Smeding • 1 year ago

Margaret Sanger, an author and social reformer, gives up nursing to devote herself full-time to the cause of birth control, a term she is credited with originating. In 1914 she flees to Europe when indicted for sending obscene materials through the mails. She returns the following year and opens the first U.S. birth control clinic in Brooklyn. In 1921, she establishes the American Birth Control League which later mergers with other groups and becomes the Planned Parenthood Federation in 1942.

  • Beth
    Beth • 1 year ago

    Yes, not a crazed abortion advocate as she's portrayed as today. It would be a pleasant change if people actually read history as opposed to listening to talk radio - the lowest form of entertainment.

  • Alisa Gilboy
    Alisa Gilboy • 1 year ago

    "Colored people are like human weeds and are to be exterminated" Margaret Sanger. I don't think she was crazy at all. I think she was a racist.

  • Nancy Goodner
    Nancy Goodner • 1 year ago

    Advocate of abortion for black babies because she was in favor of genocide for the negro race. Evil disguised by feminist for their own gains in my opinion.

  • Beth
    Beth • 1 year ago

    Her racist opinions didn't differ from most of the US population of the time. At least the white affluent population. It's nearly impossible to view the past without modern sensibilities. Just as I can't imagine such racist views, I can't imagine being arrested for purchasing birth control.

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