Categories
Log in
There’s more to see...
Sign up to see the rest of what’s here!
Visit Site
Heta Davis
Heta Davis • 2 years ago

Chiune Sugihara was a Japanese diplomat who served as Vice-Consul for the Japanese Empire in Lithuania. During 1940, when the Soviets invaded Lithuania, Sugihara issued about 6,000 exit visas to thousands of Jews desperate to get out (at the time, one visa could cover an entire family). He signed visas through his last night in the country, even until the last moment on the train, throwing them out the window to anyone who could catch one. His actions, although against Japanese policy, saved over 10,000 Jews and 40,000 of their descendants are alive today because of it. After being sacked by the Japanese government he took a number of odd jobs, including one in Siberia Russia until he died in 1986. He is honored as Righteous among the Nations by the State of Israel.

Related Pins

Yukiko Sugihara, Wife of Chiune Sugihara -- both helped Jews escape Nazi occupied Lithuania.

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn't know what he'd done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

World War 2 Poster (American)

On the 23th of August 1989 two million people across Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania joined hands, creating a human chain, to protest peacefully against the Soviet occupation.

A rose left on the train car which stands on the unloading ramp of the Auschwitz II-Birkenau site.

London, Paddington Station, 1940. School boys with gas masks evacuated by train as bombing raids intensify. Life in London during The Blitz of World War II.

WW II - Known as the Tower of Faces this three-story tower displays photographs from the Yaffa Eliach Shtetl Collection. Taken between 1890 and 1941 in Eishishok, a small town in what is now Lithuania, they describe a vibrant Jewish community that existed for 900 years. In 1941, an SS mobile killing squad entered the village and within two days massacred the entire Jewish population.

Bittersweet goodbye: For many women the moment they parted with their loved one on a train platform would be the last time they saw their RAF sweetheart

Jewish prisoners at the moment of their liberation from a death train near the Elbe

The great Jewish educator Janusz Korczak (physician, writer, and pedagogue) became head of the Warsaw Jewish Orphanage. In the ghetto, he did everything within his power to improve the situation of the children in his orphanage. Although offered the chance, he rejected the opportunity of going into hiding outside the ghetto and instead chose to stand by his orphans. On Aug 5, 1942, Korczak and the 200 children in his orphanage were deported to the Treblinka death camp where they all perished.

Charlotte E. Ray paved the way for African-American female lawyers when she became the first to be admitted to bar and argue a case in front of the D.C.Supreme Court (Gadley v. Gadley).

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the y