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Betsy Cary
Betsy Cary • 2 years ago

This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. When people see these, they think it's the end of the world. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover. #Meteorology #Weather #Clouds

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This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. When people see these, they think it's the end of the world. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover. #Meteorology #Weather #Clouds - by Repinly.com

This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a 'SKYPUNCH'. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover

This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover.

This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. When people see these, they think it's the end of the world. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover.

Per Dan Ashbach, this is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover.

A "Skypunch" in Switzerland. This rare phenomenon occurs when ice crystals form above the clouds and fall downward.

Sky punch or sun hole (apparently formed when ‘Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover’) by Terry Boswell

A rare meteorological event called a skypunch. Ice crystals form above high-altitude clouds, then fall down, punching a hole in the middle. (Source: goo.gl/mnGVl)

cirro-cumulo stratus clouds | ... by the refraction of light through ice crystals in cirrus clouds