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History By Zim
History By Zim • 2 years ago

Demonstration of protest and mourning for Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of March 25, 1911. Photo taken by an unknown photographer, New York City, New York, April 5, 1911.

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On March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire kills 146 garment workers in New York City. It remains one of the worst U.S. disasters since the Industrial Revolution.

Woolworth Building, New York, 1926. They didn't have the safety gear we have now.

Locked exit door Triangle shirtwaist Factory Fire

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York on March 25 1911 was the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of the city and resulted in the 4th highest loss of life from an industrial accident in U.S. history. The fire caused the deaths of 146 garment workers who either died from the fire or jumped to their deaths. Most of the victims were recent immigrant Jewish and Italian women aged 16 to 23.Many workers couldn't escape as managers had locked the doors to the stairwells and exits

March 1912. Row of tenements, 260 to 268 Elizabeth St., New York.

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, Mar. 25, 1911 caused the deaths of 146 garment workers who died from the fire, smoke inhalation, or falling to their deaths. Most of the victims were recent Jewish and Italian immigrant women aged 16 to 23. The oldest was 48, the youngest were two 14 year-old girls. Because managers had locked the doors to the stairwells and exits – a common practice at the time, many who could not escape the the burning building jumped from the 8th, 9th, and 10th floors.

Poor Home, New York City Tenement 1910

factory work 1800s america | Women at sewing stations in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory

Bandit's Roost, 1888, considered the most crime-ridden, dangerous part of New York City.