Categories
Log in
There's more to see...
Sign up to see the rest of what's here!
Visit Site
History By Zim
History By Zim • 2 years ago

Educator Charlotte Hawkins Brown on her wedding day in 1912. Founder of the historic Palmer Memorial Institute in North Carolina, Ms. Brown was also one of the invaluable suffragists who worked for black women to have the same equal rights black men and white women were fighting for in the early 20th century.

Related Pins

Educator Charlotte Hawkins Brown on her wedding day in 1912. Founder of the historic Palmer Memorial Institute in North Carolina, Ms. Brown was also one of the invaluable suffragists who worked for black women to have the same equal rights black men and white women were fighting for in the early 20th century.

From Sepia Roses' Vintage Black Women

Black women in history

Edna Earl Gaston (1928) Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina postcards in the North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

1920's Black Women

Inez Stroud, shortly after she became a WAC in1943 - The Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project - Inez Stroud of Wilmington, North Carolina, served in the Women’s Army Corps and then the U.S. Army from 1943 to 1969. Her papers are at the University of North Carolina, at library.uncg.edu/....

Anna Julia Cooper was a leading advocate of the rights of black women. At the turn of the 20th century, she was among a handful of black women who received a Ph.D. during that era. She received her doctorate at the University of Paris and in 1892 wrote the “Voice From the South,” a book that explored the complexities of being a woman and an African-American.

REGULATING BLACK WOMEN’S HAIR

Sojourner Truth, who was an women’s rights activist and abolitionist in the 1800s. She is remembered for giving her famous speech, “Ain’t I a Woman” in 1851 at the Ohio Women’s Rights Convention

First Black women to vote in Ettrick, Virginia, 1920 These women, left to right, are Eva Conner, Evie Carpenter, Odelle Green, Virginia Mary Branch, Anna Lindsay, Edna Colson, Edwina Wright, Johnella Frazer, and Nannie Nichols. #PersonalLeadership #Women

Women in the War Industry Amanda Smith, an African-American woman employed in the Long Beach Plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company. Between 1940 and 1944, approximately one million civilian African Americans entered the labor force; 600,000 of them were female. The proportion of black women in industrial occupations almost tripled during the war, rising from 6.5 to 18 percent. Los Angeles-area aircraft plants were among the first to offer them employment. This woman worked at the Long Beac...

7 Heroic Black Women of the 1800s