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Mona Evans
Mona Evans • 26 weeks ago

Perseus Cluster’s X-Ray Skull. [Credit: A. Fabian (IoA Cambridge) et al., NASA] Although it looks like something in torment, it’s just an X-Ray image of the Perseus Cluster of Galaxies. It doesn’t show the galaxies, only the X-rays given out by the gas between the galaxies. Mona Evans, "Cosmic Halloween Tour" www.bellaonline.c...

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Under the Wing of a Dwarf Galaxy (NASA, Chandra, 04/03/13) By NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is one of the Milky Way's closest galactic neighbors. Even though it is a small, or so-called dwarf galaxy, the SMC is so bright that it is visible to the unaided eye from the Southern Hemisphere and near the equator.

The “Black Widow” pulsar is moving through the galaxy at a speed of almost a million kilometers per hour. A bow shock wave due to this motion is visible to optical telescopes, shown in this image as the greenish crescent shape. The pressure behind the bow shock creates a second shock wave that sweeps the cloud of high-energy particles back from the pulsar to form the cocoon.