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Mona Evans
Mona Evans • 34 weeks ago

Voyager 1's portrait of Earth. (Image credit: NASA/JPL) On February 14, 1990, Voyager was turned to take images of the Solar System. The Earth was there, the "pale blue dot" Carl Sagan christened it. Mona Evans, "Voyager 1 - Gas Giants and a Last Look Homeward"

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