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An unidentified woman who worked at the Four Wheel Drive factory in Clintonville assembling trucks during World War I. She is wearing a special uniform for women workers (c.1918). #vintage #WW1 #homefront

The late Madam Yoko (1849–1906), Chief of Moyamba - Madam Yoko or Mammy Yoko (ca. 1849–1906) was a leader of the Mende people in Sierra Leone. Combining advantageous lineage, shrewd marriage choices and the power afforded her from the secret Sande society, Yoko became a leader of considerable influence. She expanded the Mende Kingdom and at the time of her death, she was the ruler of the vast Kpa Mende Confederacy.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque or obituaries mention her greatest discovery…Everyone knows Charles Darwin discovered evolution and Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, textbooks simply say the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know? Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, a truly extraordinary woman.

Louisa May Alcott, nurse during the Civil War and well known author, wrote "Little Women"

The Dahomey Amazons are the only documented all-female official front-line combat arms military unit in modern history. Single-mindedly devoted to hardening themselves into ruthless instruments of battlefield destruction, these machete-wielding, musket-slinging lady terminators were rightly-feared throughout Western Africa for over 250 years.

This is the only probable picture of Kate Warne, the first female detective. Not only was she the first detective, but she even went on to save the life of president elect Abraham Lincoln after uncovering a plot to assassinate him on the way to Washington D.C. to take office. She was best known for being a master of disguise, able to switch from Union soldier, to Southern debutante, to a harmless grandmother.

Fannie Lou Hamer was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. Her plain-spoken manner and fervent belief in the Biblical righteousness of her cause gained her a reputation as an electrifying speaker and constant activist of civil rights.