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Historic Newspapers~ The World dated 02/02/1890 -- New York World correspondent Nellie Bly circled the globe in record time: 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes. The trip, sponsored and arranged by the young female reporter's newspaper, retraced the journey of fictional character Phileas Fogg in Jules Verne's book "Around the World in Eighty Days." On exhibit in the News Corporation News History Gallery at the Newseum. Newseum collection Photo credit: Newseum collection

Tererai Trent, PhD, is a Zimbabwean-American woman who was not allowed to go to school as a child because she was female. Tererai was forced to marry at age 11. By age 18, she was the mother of three. "When my husband realized that I wanted to have an education, he would beat me." In 2009, happily remarried Trent earned her doctorate; her thesis looked at HIV/AIDS prevention programs for women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa.

During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded honor of the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946.

An unidentified woman who worked at the Four Wheel Drive factory in Clintonville assembling trucks during World War I. She is wearing a special uniform for women workers (c.1918). #vintage #WW1 #homefront

Mary Seacole, Jamaican Herbalist. During Crimean War performed surgery on the frontline and established the "British Hotel" providing supplies for soldiers and quarters for sick and infirmed. ~Repinned Via Montford Point Marines and Honor Blogspot

Virginia Woolf (25 Jan 1882–28 Mar 1941), English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century. During the interwar period, she was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and Orlando, and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own, with its famous dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction."

Susan B Anthony pummeled and arrested for attempting to vote in 1872. She was fined 100 dollars for registering to vote.

Calamity Jane

Marie Bottineau Baldwin (1863-1952) was a Chippewa attorney. Marie was the first Native American student and first woman of color to graduate from the Washington College of Law. Today the Women’s Law Association at her alma mater funds a scholarship in her name. Following law school, Marie worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and was treasurer the Society of American Indians.