Categories
Log in
There’s more to see...
Sign up to see the rest of what’s here!
Visit Site
Lark Kephart
Lark Kephart • 1 year ago

"The Bewcastle Cross is an Anglo-Saxon cross which is still in its original position within the churchyard of St Cuthbert's church at Bewcastle, in the English county of Cumbria. The cross, which probably dates from the 7th or early 8th century, features reliefs and inscriptions in the runic alphabet. The head of the cross is missing but the remains are 14.5 feet (4.4 metres) high, and almost square in section (56 x 54 cm at the base). "

Related Pins

A 7th century Anglo Saxon cross in the churchyard at Eyam in the Peaks District.

Ye Olde Cock Tavern, Fleet St, London

✮ Basilica in St Marks Square in Venice, Italy

The Ruthwell Cross is a stone Anglo-Saxon cross probably dating from the 8th century,[1] when Ruthwell was part of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria; it is now in Scotland.

Anglo-Saxon cross shaft at Masham church, North Yorkshire.

British Museum - jewellery Anglo Saxon

Carved Panel from the great Cross of Lindisfarne Abbey, Northumberland. The patterns are copied from the illuminated books created by the monks of Lindisfarne Abbey. An inscription added to the panels honours God and St. Cuthbert by Eadfrith, Bishop of Lindisfarne in 721.

Edale Cross, Peak District, England

In several wooded areas around Cumbria and Portmeirion in the UK, people have been hammering small denomination coins intro trees for centuries. The practice is said to date back as far as the early 1700s, in Scotland, where ill people would stick florins into trees in hopes that the trees would cure their illnesses. In 1877, Queen Victoria wrote about visiting an oak tree with coins stuck in it in Scotland’s Highlands. Amazing.