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Angelocracy Xue
Angelocracy Xue • 2 years ago

Bomb sniffer dog Corporal Ace seaches for explosives near a US Marine during a patrol around Huskers camp in the outskirts of Marjah in central Helmand on January 26. Corporal Ace is one of a quartet of expert dogs trained to sniff five kinds of explosives, from military grade plastic C-4 bombs to chemicals used by the Taliban to make their so-called improvised explosive devices (IEDs). #military dogs

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US Marines are using sniffer dogs, complete with military rank, to lead them to safety as they move along dusty foot paths where insurgents are increasingly using improvised explosive devices to target US forces. Corporals Goodwin and Brooks are half of a quartet of expert dogs trained to sniff five kinds of explosives. #military dogs

U.S. Marines from 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 8, carry an injured bomb-tracking dog to an awaiting helicopter at Forward Operating Base Jackson. The Marines and Afghan Uniformed Policeman were struck by a suicide bomber using a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device while on a patrol.

Cpl. Derrick Magee, 21, dog handler with 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, from Vineland, N.J. and his dog, TTroy, rest during a patrol break. TTroy is part of the Lackland Air Force Base puppy program and is identified by a double letter first name. This signifies that his parents were both military working dogs. He is trained to find military grade and home made explosives

Cpl. Derrick Magee, 21, dog handler with 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, from Vineland, N.J. and his dog, TTroy, rest during a patrol break. TTroy is part of the Lackland Air Force Base puppy program and is identified by a double letter first name. This signifies that his parents were both military working dogs. He is trained to find military grade and home made explosives. by Staff Sgt. Robert Storm

Lance Cpls. Matthew Scofield (left), 19, from Syracuse, N.Y., and Jarrett Hatley, 21, from Millingport, N.C., a squad automatic weapon gunner and an improvised explosive device detection dog handler with 3rd Platoon, Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, rest next to Hatley's dog Blue after clearing compounds with Afghan National Army soldiers during Operation Tageer Shamal (Shifting Winds) here, Jan. 4. Over the past five years, coalition forces have operated with Afghan National...